Alex Schweder and Ward Shelley

Your Turn

The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is pleased to present Alex Schweder and Ward Shelley: Your Turn, an architectural environment for two that shapes the occupants’ behavior. In a series of performances Schweder and Shelley will physically occupy the structure for extended periods during which they will negotiate the sharing of nine basic amenities while engaging the public with their daily routines and conversations. Schweder and Shelley’s collaboration is primarily based on balance: not only the balance needed to successfully work in a partnership, but also the social balance needed to share resources limited by the confines of their construction. Their practice conflates architectural form and function with performance art, coaxing meaning out of both the practical and the absurd. The exhibition will be on view October 1, 2017 to April 22, 2018.

Schweder and Shelley’s unique collaboration of over a decade has coalesced into what they call “performance architecture,” a new genre in which the two artists design, construct, and then physically occupy structures, blurring the boundaries between architecture, sculpture, design, and performance, exploring both the nature of social space and the way architecture influences human behavior. For their exhibition at The Aldrich, they will construct a twenty-four-foot-high living environment, which they will inhabit as both the authors and living subjects of the work. An adjacent gallery will present the first survey of their reverse paintings on Mylar, which not only act as preliminary renderings for their projects, but also as autonomous works that reinforce the formal aspects of their practice.

The artists will occupy opposing sides of the monolith with nine amenities (including a bed, a desk, an easy chair, a kitchen, a sink, and an enclosed composting toilet), each of which will slide on steel tracks from one side of the structure to the other. So, when Shelley is sleeping in the bed, Schweder cannot sleep; when Schweder is writing at the desk, Shelley cannot use it. The sharing of the amenities is based on both a pre-planned schedule and spontaneous negotiation. For the performance periods the artists will wear identical jumpsuits, bring all necessary supplies with them, and occupy the structure twenty-four hours a day. The artists’ lives, while within the structure, will be on public view when the Museum is open, and visitors are free—in fact, are encouraged by the artists—to engage them in conversation. When awake, Schweder and Shelley will each read, work, prepare meals, and complete acts of simple daily hygiene.

Alex Schweder received a BA from the Pratt Institute School of Architecture, an MArch from Princeton University School of Architecture, and a PhD from the Department of Architecture at the University of Cambridge, UK. Recent exhibitions include the 2014 Venice Biennale, the Tel Aviv Art Museum, the 2013 Moscow Biennial, the 2013 Lisbon Architecture Biennial, and the Tate Britain. He has been an artist in residence at the Kohler Company and the Chinati Foundation, and was awarded the Rome Prize in Architecture at The American Academy in Rome.

Ward Shelley received a BFA from Eckard College and an MA from New York University. Solo exhibitions of his work include Pierogi Gallery, NY; Massimo Carasi Gallery, Milan; Center for Contemporary Art and Launch Projects, Santa Fe; and Socrates Sculpture Park, NY. He has received a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant, an award from the Joan Mitchell Foundation, two fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts, and a fellowship from The American Academy in Rome.

A full-color, soft-cover scholarly publication will be available during the exhibition.

Organized by Richard Klein, exhibitions director, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum.

For press inquiries, please contact Emily Devoe at 203.438.4519, extension 140, or edevoe@aldrichart.org

Alex Schweder and Ward Shelley: Your Turn is generously supported by Crozier. The official media partner for this exhibition is Connecticut Cottages & Gardens (CTC&G).

Anissa Mack

Junk Kaleidoscope

October 1, 2017, to April 22, 2018

Anissa Mack: Junk Kaleidoscope is a reflection on Mack’s The Fair project, realized in both 1996 and 2006, to be reimagined at the Museum from October 1, 2017, to April 22, 2018. Mack mines Americana, its artifacts, folklore, and rituals, and explores American vernacular traditions, examining their shifting role in a dialogue between the history of art making and the culture of collecting. Through all new objects, Junk Kaleidoscope will re-envision The Fair in a way that weaves together over two decades of work, sixty miles from the Durham Fair fairgrounds that inspired this project.

The Fair was first realized in 1996, when Mack entered all seventy-three craft categories at the Durham Fair, the largest agricultural fair in Connecticut; she had participatedin the fair, located near her hometown of Guilford, CT, throughout her childhood. In 2006, she remade the project as The Fair (10thAnniversary Edition) by generating new entries for all of the craft categories available that year. On both occasions, the objects were displayed at the fairs and then (re)presented in a commercial gallery with their winning ribbons. At The Aldrich, Mack will create a layered exhibition that engages fairs in new ways. For Junk Kaleidoscope, she will utilize a self-generated list of seventy categories—comprising actual competition categories collected from various county and state fairs, as well as those of her own invention—to generate and support the works in the show. The list will serve as a catalyst for production and as a framework for understanding the shifting, participatory display that the objects will enjoy at The Aldrich.

For Mack, “fairs serve as fascinatingly complex archives that mirror both ‘America’ and the art world.” Repetition, displacement, and distortion are constant concerns and the act of revisiting is an ongoing theme. Mack attends county and state fairs nationwide, where her experiences fundamentally reshape her approach to the creation and staging of her work. The atmosphere of the local fair and the environment of the artist’s studio share similar outtakes, as both are equally concerned with narrative, arrangement, and (e)valuation. Her appropriation of the fair’s system of categorization attempts to undo or rewrite storylines embedded within local material culture. These objects are symbolic containers of a collective memory that can travel across time. Ultimately, Mack positions herself as both an artist and maker, placing herself inside a subculture and adopting its system of classification for her own (re)invention. This enables Mack to move seamlessly between two distinctive locales and contexts, each of which has its own structure, methodology, and currency. The objects embody these alternating experiences and distinguishing histories.

The artist and the Museum invite the public to play a crucial role in Junk Kaleidoscope, through the All’s Fair program. In All’s Fair, participants will work directly with the artist, share their voice and vision, and collaborate with one another to re-install the objects in Mack’s exhibition in the Museum’s galleries in January 2018.

Anissa Mack (b. 1970, Guilford, CT) received her BA from Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT, in 1992 and her MFA from Temple University, Philadelphia, in 1996. Recent solo exhibitions include the Santa Barbara Contemporary Art Museum; Atlanta Contemporary Art Center; Josh Lilley Gallery, London; and Laurel Gitlen, New York. Her work has been included in group exhibitions at CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, France; Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia; Tanya Bonakdar, New York; amongst many others. She lives and works in New York City.

A full-color, soft-cover scholarly publication will be available during the exhibition.

Organized by Amy Smith-Stewart, curator, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum.

For press inquiries, please contact Emily Devoe at 203.438.4519, extension 140, or edevoe@aldrichart.org

Generous funding for Anissa Mack: Junk Kaleidoscope is provided by The Amadeo Family.

Shared Space: A New Era

Shared Space: A New Era

October 1, 2017, to April 22, 2018

The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is pleased to present Shared Space: A New Era, an exhibition of photographs and video from 1987 through 2010 that considers the world’s social, economic, and political climate over the past thirty years and how the growing impact of technology during this time, with radically increased and diversified communication, has introduced a new phase of globalization. This exhibition has been curated by Lillian Lambrechts from the Bank of America Collection and is on loan from its Art in our Communities® program.

Shared Space features contemporary artists from twelve countries: the United States, Great Britain, Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, India, Iran, Italy, Japan, Mexico, the Czech Republic, and Switzerland. These artists capture myriad spaces for communication and interaction—urban and rural landscapes,homes and backyards, city streets and plazas, and ports and terminals. The exhibition’s point of departure is 1987, a seminal year that marks the signing of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty by Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev, and soon thereafter the fall of the Berlin Wall, events marking the end of the Cold War and the beginning of a new age of international exchange.

Sze Tsung Leong’s cityscapes illustrate the impact of a global economy. Thomas Ruff’s and Günther Förg’s photographs show the rapid transformation of the built environment through images of Modernist architecture constructed upon utopian ideals, now derelict and failing to realize its original intention. Photographs by Raghubir Singh, Thomas Struth, and Massimo Vitali depict masses of people gathering in public spaces from Los Angeles to Vietnam, and the Netherlands—expressing an unprecedented universality of access to information. Despite the interconnectivity of this time, a distancing and disconnect remains between individuals and groups, near and afar, as evidenced in Ben Gest’s Jessica & Samantha (2003), family members in close physical proximity who seem deeply psychologically distanced from one another. Shared Space reminds viewers of their place in the world and their role and impact on current global and interpersonal affairs while also provoking them to consider how they will contribute to “shared space” in the future.

“Bank of America is committed to strengthening artistic institutions and in turn, the communities we serve,” said Bill Tommins, Bank of America Southern Connecticut Market President. “Sharing our collection with the public through partners such as The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum not only makes business sense for the bank, but also helps support museums in Connecticut.”

For press inquiries, please contact Emily Devoe at 203.438.4519, extension 140, or edevoe@aldrichart.org

Shared Space: A New Era is generously supported by the Bank of America Art in our Communities® program and Crozier.

Tony Matelli

Hera

May 6, 2017, to October 21, 2017

Tony Matelli, Hera, 2017. Courtesy of the artist and Marlborough Contemporary, New York.
Tony Matelli, Hera, 2017. Courtesy of the artist and Marlborough Contemporary, New York.

The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is pleased to present Tony Matelli’s Hera, a monumental sculpture, as part of the Main Street Sculpture series, which offers an opportunity for artists to create site-specific work for The Aldrich’s most public site, the front lawn. Matelli will debut his singular, larger-than-life-size outdoor figurative sculpture on May 6, 2017. This work is an extension of Matelli’s Garden Sculptures series, initiated in 2015, in which he defaces garden statuary of classical or religious icons and subverts material expectation. Based on an ancient Greek statue of Hera and poised atop a pedestal, the statue, fabricated out of cast stone, is painstakingly aged to mimic a centuries old patina. An imposing nine-feet tall and sited on a three-foot tall pedestal, the neo-classical figure will be juxtaposed with flawlessly hand-painted cast bronze watermelons, whole, halved, and quartered, that balance upon her head, within the creases and folds of her drapery, and at her feet. These faux-perishables, poised upon the intentionally eroded and debased figure, are presented in an eternal state of freshness. In doing so, Matelli stages opposing entropic forces, the synthetically preserved, and the forcibly decayed. Spanning sculpture and painting, Matelli’s hyperreal practice embodies the human condition. Suspended in changing physical states or transformative stages of existence, his work concerns the very circumstance of actuality, joining the ordinary with the speculative in order to assess cultural worth: what people keep or abandon, what appears to be in or out of place, and what seems pleasing or distasteful. Often provocative and hallucinatory, Matelli’s work expresses excess, neglect, decomposition, and regeneration, the upturned and the adrift, the romantic and the surreal. At The Aldrich, Matelli’s colossal sculpture of a familiar mythological figure may read as a modern memento mori, or as a devotional offering to a saccharine present, cast against a corrosive past. Ridgefield, a Revolutionary-era Colonial town with a landmarked Main Street, is a befitting location for this tragicomic siting, as Matelli’s ancient giant testifies to history as theatrical backdrop. Tony Matelli (b. 1971, Chicago) received his BFA from the Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design in 1993 and his MFA from the Cranbrook Academy of Art in 1995. Recent solo exhibitions include the State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia; the Davis Museum, MA; Künsterlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin; and the Palais de Tokyo, Paris. A mid-career survey, Tony Matelli: A Human Echo, premiered at the ARoS Aarhus Kunstmuseum, Denmark in 2012 and traveled to the Bergen Kunstmuseum, Norway in 2013. His work is in numerous public collections including the FLAG Art Foundation, NY; ARoS Aarhus Kunstmuseum, Aarhus, Denmark; and the National Centre of Contemporary Art, Moscow, Russia, among others. He lives and works in New York City.

Organized by Amy Smith-Stewart, curator, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum.

For press inquiries, please contact Emily Devoe at 203.438.4519, x 140, or edevoe@aldrichart.org

Tony Matelli: Hera is generously supported by the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation and Crozier.

Jack Whitten Awarded with Third Annual A2A Award January 2017

May, 2017

Artist Jack Whitten will receive the third annual A2A Award at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum’s annual Gala Benefit and Auction on May 6, 2017. Past recipients include Tom Sachs and Jackie Winsor.

Kay Rosen: H Is For House

H Is for House is Kay Rosen’s first solo museum exhibition in the northeast in almost twenty years. This exhibition premieres a series of new works, all painted in black and white, which the artist has completed since 2015.

Rosen’s text-based works use formalism, linguistics, and humor to reveal content that is hidden within both the structural nature of written language and the ways in which meaning can be generated through the manipulation of text. The exhibition will include fourteen works on paper, as well as two monumental wall paintings, the largest incorporating two walls and covering over 700 square feet. Rosen approaches written language as structure, with words and letterforms functioning as building blocks, and where, through unusual typographic arrangements, words and phrases can embody the thing they are describing. Rosen has created these new wall paintings to play off the interior space of the Museum, using the existing architecture to amplify each work’s content. Similarly, the vertical “architecture” of the paper works sets up a space for the text to play off, guiding meaning, letter orientation and size, and number of lines. Turning architect Louis Sullivan’s dictum that “form follows function” on its head, Rosen’s works take the forms inherent in text to create new functions for the written word.

The title H Is for House references both the alphabet—the raw material of Rosen’s work—and the architectural nature of the works included in the exhibition. The vertical portrait format relates both to the figure and the pull of gravity, and the atypical disruptions of the text have the curious quality of effecting bodily orientation, with the viewer’s eyes being put into the position of twisting to accommodate the off-kilter compositions. Related to, but different from the genre of concrete poetry, Rosen’s wordplays creatively reinforce the relationship between form and meaning.

Kay Rosen (b. 1943, Corpus Christi, TX) studied languages and linguistics at Newcomb College at Tulane University and received her MA in linguistics from Northwestern University. Realizing that the aspects of language that most interested her needed to be expressed visually, for the past four decades Rosen has channeled her exploration of language through color, scale, art materials, and non-linear composition. Her work is included in many public collections including the Whitney Museum of American Art; the Art Institute of Chicago; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney; and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Rosen currently lives and works in Gary, IN ,and New York, and teaches at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

A full-color, soft-cover scholarly publication will be available during the exhibition.

Organized by Richard Klein, exhibitions director, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum.

For press inquiries, please contact Emily Devoe at 203.438.4519, extension 140, or edevoe@aldrichart.orgT 06877

Major funding for exhibitions is provided by the Department of Economic and Community Development, Connecticut Office of the Arts; the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation; and Crozier. Additional support is provided by Hotel Zero Degrees, Danbury.

William Powhida: After the Contemporary

William Powhida: After the Contemporary, a fictive review of today’s art world from the year 2050, is Powhida’s first solo museum exhibition and will draw from a variety of academic, curatorial, philosophical, and sociological sources, as well as the genre of speculative fiction.

For more than a decade Powhida’s work has provided a satirical, political, and sometimes despairing window into his own experience of New York’s contemporary art market. Beneath it all, he has also been tracing the outline of another, more ambitious project as he tries to answer—for himself, his peers, and the world in general—what is the strange, slippery, sometimes contradictory and farcical thing we call “Contemporary Art.” Is Contemporary Art a specific period of art history, like Modern Art? If so, what are its characteristics? Will we know when it’s over? And more importantly, what does Contemporary Art suggest about the future of society?

The less than reliable curatorial voice from Powhida’s future proposes an authoritative account of our present and near future through institutional forms—wall texts, videos, an exhibition catalogue, as well as fictional works of art, speculative drawings, and research-based diagrams, that point to the ways exhibitions shape and reflect histories. Specifically, the exhibition examines the role of the art market in defining the Contemporary through the presentation of a new gallery model for art fairs that emerged in the early twentieth century as a “period room,” within an alternative future wing of The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum which has had to make certain adjustments due to global ecological and economic turmoil.

William Powhida (b. 1976, New York, NY) received his BFA in Painting with Honors from Syracuse University in 1998 and his MFA in Painting from Hunter College in 2002. He has had recent solo exhibitions at Postmasters Gallery, New York; Charlie James Gallery, Los Angeles; Casa Maauad, Mexico City; Gallery Paulsen, Copenhagen; and Marlborough Gallery, New York. In addition to being an artist, Powhida is an active critic and writer whose work has been published in The Art Newspaper, Creative Time Reports, ArtFCity, Hyperallergic, The Brooklyn Rail, and Artnet. He lives and works in New York City.

A full-color, soft-cover scholarly publication will be available during the exhibition.

Organized by Richard Klein, exhibitions director, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum.

For press inquiries, please contact Emily Devoe at 203.438.4519, extension 140, or edevoe@aldrichart.org

Generous funding for William Powhida: After the Contemporary is provided by The Stolbun Collection, Raymond Learsy, Seymour and Carol Cole Levin, Kim and Larry Heyman, Noah McCormack, Cebert S.J. Noonan, and Janet Phelps.

Major funding for exhibitions is provided by the Department of Economic and Community Development, Connecticut Office of the Arts; the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation; and Crozier. Additional support is provided by Hotel Zero Degrees, Danbury.

Beth Campbell: My Potential Future Past

Beth Campbell: My Potential Future Past is Campbell’s first museum survey. This exhibition will present three interrelated bodies of work, the Potential Future Drawings series (1998–present), Mobiles (2008–present), and the Future Past Drawings series (2014–present).

Campbell’s practice ranges from drawing to sculpture and installation, and centers on an extensive exploration of the potential latent within everyday experience. She exploits the “what ifs,” channeling those life choices that shape who we think we want to be or who we might really become. In Campbell’s world, objects are personified, rooms multiply, mirrors become portals, and streaming thoughts predict future outcomes. She exposes the inherent beingness underlying daily phenomena through a manipulation of reality, an externalization of internal sensations, and a deft employment of humor, ultimately challenging our perception of the human dimension.

In 1998, Campbell introduced her now-acclaimed Potential Future Drawings series, channeling the Surrealists to give tangible shape to interior monologues. She begins with an event in her own life, and then uses a diagrammatic system to create a latticework of potential outcomes from the most wanted to the most devastating. Campbell mirrors our inward desire for mass acceptance and wide success, while also tapping into our general fear of ultimate failure and crushing embarrassment. The mobiles inspired by the formal acceptance of these mind maps, and appear like chandeliers, or vascular or root systems, function as abstract drawings in space as seen in My Mother’s House (2016). Comprised of bent steel and wire, some in taut primary colors, they vary in size—from body size to architecturally scaled—and cast shadows and create pulsating optical patterns that mime the circulatory matrix of her drawings. The Future Past Drawings series, initiated in 2014, includes the newest work in the exhibition. All the drawings in this series are on black paper and, like the Potential Future Drawings, they operate as a flowing feed; reflecting back and looking forward, they conflate personal and historical experience, in the end considering how subjectivity reshapes the past to condition the future.

Beth Campbell (b. 1971, Illinois) received her BFA from Truman State University in 1989, her MFA from Ohio University in 1997, and attended Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 1997. Her work is included in the collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art and The Museum of Modern Art, New York, among others. She lives and works in New York City.

A full-color, soft-cover scholarly publication will be available during the exhibition.

Organized by Amy Smith-Stewart, curator, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum.

For press inquiries, please contact Emily Devoe at 203.438.4519, extension 140, or edevoe@aldrichart.org

Generous funding for Beth Campbell: My Potential Future Past is provided by Bart McDonough and Cheryl Horner.

Major funding for exhibitions is provided by the Department of Economic and Community Development, Connecticut Office of the Arts; the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation; and Crozier. Additional support is provided by Hotel Zero Degrees, Danbury.

Suzanne McClelland: Just Left Feel Right

Suzanne McClelland: Just Left Feel Right, is McClelland’s first museum survey. Spanning twenty-five years, Just Left Feel Right focuses on works from specific periods of her career that share a distinctive commonality, capturing the eruptive and disparate voices of a shifting American vernacular and its rippling effect on the way we communicate in our hyperkinetic time.

McClelland is most widely known for her deft use of linguistics and her sensually textured surfaces. She mines the ways in which communities speak, collecting language and choosing words that trend, are debated, heard on street corners, and absorbed from streaming news feeds; words that are rich in meaning, that reach and multiply, that drop in and out of everyday life. The words she selects hover between materials; letters press up against each other, run off the surface, join together, dissolve, loop, and collide into and onto themselves. Employing a wide range of materials, her compositions have a rhythm and beat as they perform, throb, and swagger, capturing the cadences of our speech, mimicking the physicality of how people express themselves. Pauses, utterances, and hysteria, the inflection of tone and the modulation of our tempo, bodily expressions and gesticulations, all are translated into painterly rhythmic compositions modeled after oratory repartee.

McClelland seizes these audible sensations, stealing words right out of the mouth, but also embodying our micro-expressions. In 2012, she began to incorporate numbers into her work as a reaction to the data onslaught of the Internet age. A mind-numbing rush of streaming lists for everything and anything are published on the Web. McClelland, a collector of messaging, in particular emotive and directional information, began researching the data that represents the individual and vice versa. This endless data stream is how twenty-first century society forecasts outcomes: from steady news spills that flood the imaginations, to engineering distorted images about identity and body type, and (in)forming biased estimates and postures. With the rise of social media as a primary source of content, opinion is now often misread as “news.”

This survey will include a seminal painting from the series Right (1993), originally shown as part of a group of paintings in the 1993 Whitney Biennial; the painting series Rap Sheet (2010-13), portraits of early female rap and hip hop artists during the “Roxanne Wars” in the Bronx; the painting series Action Objects (2010); paintings from the series Left (2011); the debut of three new paintings from the Before Tomorrow series (2015-16); and the premiere of a new site-engaged installation, third party (2016-17), which will incorporate materials such as glass, ceramic, and paint. Just Left Feel Right will also include many other never-before-exhibited works from past and current series.

Suzanne McClelland (b. 1959, Jacksonville, FL) received a BFA from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor 1981. She moved to New York that year and later attended the School of Visual Arts MFA program, graduating in 1989. McClelland’s work can be found in numerous public collections including the Brooklyn Museum, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, and the Whitney Museum of American Art. She lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a full-color, soft-cover scholarly publication, available during the exhibition, intended to serve as an enduring archival document and limited-edition artwork. It will include images of the works in the exhibition, a checklist, an essay by the curator, and a poster designed by the artist.

Organized by Amy Smith-Stewart, curator, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum.

For press inquiries, please contact Emily Devoe at 203.438.4519, extension 140, or edevoe@aldrichart.org

Generous funding for Suzanne McClelland: Just Left Feel Right is provided by by Agnes Gund, GS Gives, Stephanie and Tim Ingrassia, James Cottrell and Joseph Lovett, Seymour and Carol Cole Levin, Carole Server and Oliver Frankel, and Thomson Family Philanthropy, NYC.

Major funding for exhibitions is provided by the Department of Economic and Community Development, Connecticut Office of the Arts; the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation; and Crozier. Additional support is provided by Hotel Zero Degrees, Danbury.

Exhibition

Kay Rosen

H Is for House

March 5, 2017, to September 4, 2017

Kay Rosen, Head Over Heels, 2017; Courtesy of the artist
H Is for House, 2017; Courtesy of the artist


H Is for House is Kay Rosen’s first solo museum exhibition in the northeast in almost twenty years. This exhibition premieres a series of new works, all painted in black and white, which the artist has completed since 2015. Rosen’s text-based works use formalism, linguistics, and humor to reveal content that is hidden within both the structural nature of written language and the ways in which meaning can be generated through the manipulation of text. The exhibition will include fourteen works on paper, as well as two monumental wall paintings, the largest incorporating two walls and covering over 700 square feet. Rosen approaches written language as structure, with words and letterforms functioning as building blocks, and where, through unusual typographic arrangements, words and phrases can embody the thing they are describing. Rosen has created these new wall paintings to play off the interior space of the Museum, using the existing architecture to amplify each work’s content. Similarly, the vertical “architecture” of the paper works sets up a space for the text to play off, guiding meaning, letter orientation and size, and number of lines. Turning architect Louis Sullivan’s dictum that “form follows function” on its head, Rosen’s works take the forms inherent in text to create new functions for the written word.

The title H Is for House references both the alphabet—the raw material of Rosen’s work—and the architectural nature of the works included in the exhibition. The vertical portrait format relates both to the figure and the pull of gravity, and the atypical disruptions of the text have the curious quality of effecting bodily orientation, with the viewer’s eyes being put into the position of twisting to accommodate the off-kilter compositions. Related to, but different from the genre of concrete poetry, Rosen’s wordplays creatively reinforce the relationship between form and meaning.

Kay Rosen (b. 1943, Corpus Christi, TX) studied languages and linguistics at Newcomb College at Tulane University and received her MA in linguistics from Northwestern University. Realizing that the aspects of language that most interested her needed to be expressed visually, for the past four decades Rosen has channeled her exploration of language through color, scale, art materials, and non-linear composition. Her work is included in many public collections including the Whitney Museum of American Art; the Art Institute of Chicago; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney; and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Rosen currently lives and works in Gary, IN ,and New York, and teaches at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

A full-color, soft-cover scholarly publication will be available during the exhibition.

Organized by Richard Klein, exhibitions director, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum.

For press inquiries, please contact Emily Devoe at 203.438.4519, extension 140, or edevoe@aldrichart.org

Major funding for exhibitions is provided by the Department of Economic and Community Development, Connecticut Office of the Arts; the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation; and Crozier. Additional support is provided by Hotel Zero Degrees, Danbury.

Exhibition

William Powhida

After the Contemporary

March 5, 2017, to September 4, 2017

William Powhida, After the Contemporary (installation view), 2017
William Powhida, After the Contemporary (installation view), 2017; Courtesy of the artist and Postmasters Gallery


For more than a decade Powhida’s work has provided a satirical, political, and sometimes despairing window into his own experience of New York’s contemporary art market. Beneath it all, he has also been tracing the outline of another, more ambitious project as he tries to answer—for himself, his peers, and the world in general—what is the strange, slippery, sometimes contradictory and farcical thing we call “Contemporary Art.” Is Contemporary Art a specific period of art history, like Modern Art? If so, what are its characteristics? Will we know when it’s over? And more importantly, what does Contemporary Art suggest about the future of society?

The less than reliable curatorial voice from Powhida’s future proposes an authoritative account of our present and near future through institutional forms—wall texts, videos, an exhibition catalogue, as well as fictional works of art, speculative drawings, and research-based diagrams, that point to the ways exhibitions shape and reflect histories. Specifically, the exhibition examines the role of the art market in defining the Contemporary through the presentation of a new gallery model for art fairs that emerged in the early twentieth century as a “period room,” within an alternative future wing of The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum which has had to make certain adjustments due to global ecological and economic turmoil. William Powhida (b. 1976, New York, NY) received his BFA in Painting with Honors from Syracuse University in 1998 and his MFA in Painting from Hunter College in 2002. He has had recent solo exhibitions at Postmasters Gallery, New York; Charlie James Gallery, Los Angeles; Casa Maauad, Mexico City; Gallery Paulsen, Copenhagen; and Marlborough Gallery, New York. In addition to being an artist, Powhida is an active critic and writer whose work has been published in The Art Newspaper, Creative Time Reports, ArtFCity, Hyperallergic, The Brooklyn Rail, and Artnet. He lives and works in New York City. A full-color, soft-cover scholarly publication will be available during the exhibition. Organized by Richard Klein, exhibitions director, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum. For press inquiries, please contact Emily Devoe at 203.438.4519, extension 140, or edevoe@aldrichart.org

Generous funding for William Powhida: After the Contemporary is provided by The Stolbun Collection, Raymond Learsy, Seymour and Carol Cole Levin, Kim and Larry Heyman, Noah McCormack, Cebert S.J. Noonan, and Janet Phelps. Major funding for exhibitions is provided by the Department of Economic and Community Development, Connecticut Office of the Arts; the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation; and Crozier. Additional support is provided by Hotel Zero Degrees, Danbury.

Exhibition

Beth Campbell

My Potential Future Past

March 5, 2017, to September 4, 2017

Beth Campbell, My Potential Future Past (installation view), 2017; Courtesy of the artist and Kate Werble Gallery, New York
Beth Campbell, My Potential Future Past (installation view), 2017; Courtesy of the artist and Kate Werble Gallery, New York


Beth Campbell: My Potential Future Past is Campbell’s first museum survey. This exhibition will present three interrelated bodies of work, the Potential Future Drawings series (1998–present), Mobiles (2008–present), and the Future Past Drawings series (2014–present). Campbell’s practice ranges from drawing to sculpture and installation, and centers on an extensive exploration of the potential latent within everyday experience. She exploits the “what ifs,” channeling those life choices that shape who we think we want to be or who we might really become. In Campbell’s world, objects are personified, rooms multiply, mirrors become portals, and streaming thoughts predict future outcomes. She exposes the inherent beingness underlying daily phenomena through a manipulation of reality, an externalization of internal sensations, and a deft employment of humor, ultimately challenging our perception of the human dimension.

In 1998, Campbell introduced her now-acclaimed Potential Future Drawings series, channeling the Surrealists to give tangible shape to interior monologues. She begins with an event in her own life, and then uses a diagrammatic system to create a latticework of potential outcomes from the most wanted to the most devastating. Campbell mirrors our inward desire for mass acceptance and wide success, while also tapping into our general fear of ultimate failure and crushing embarrassment. The mobiles inspired by the formal acceptance of these mind maps, and appear like chandeliers, or vascular or root systems, function as abstract drawings in space as seen in My Mother’s House (2016). Comprised of bent steel and wire, some in taut primary colors, they vary in size—from body size to architecturally scaled—and cast shadows and create pulsating optical patterns that mime the circulatory matrix of her drawings. The Future Past Drawings series, initiated in 2014, includes the newest work in the exhibition. All the drawings in this series are on black paper and, like the Potential Future Drawings, they operate as a flowing feed; reflecting back and looking forward, they conflate personal and historical experience, in the end considering how subjectivity reshapes the past to condition the future.

Beth Campbell (b. 1971, Illinois) received her BFA from Truman State University in 1989, her MFA from Ohio University in 1997, and attended Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in 1997. Her work is included in the collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art and The Museum of Modern Art, New York, among others. She lives and works in New York City.

A full-color, soft-cover scholarly publication will be available during the exhibition.

Organized by Amy Smith-Stewart, curator, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum.

For press inquiries, please contact Emily Devoe at 203.438.4519, extension 140, or edevoe@aldrichart.org

Generous funding for Beth Campbell: My Potential Future Past is provided by Bart McDonough and Cheryl Horner.

Major funding for exhibitions is provided by the Department of Economic and Community Development, Connecticut Office of the Arts; the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation; and Crozier. Additional support is provided by Hotel Zero Degrees, Danbury.

Exhibition

Suzanne McClelland

Just Left Feel Right

March 5, 2017, to September 4, 2017

Suzanne McClelland, Just Left Feel Right (installation view), 2017; Courtesy of the artist.
Suzanne McClelland, Just Left Feel Right (installation view), 2017; Courtesy of the artist.



Suzanne McClelland: Just Left Feel Right, is McClelland’s first museum survey. Spanning twenty-five years, Just Left Feel Right focuses on works from specific periods of her career that share a distinctive commonality, capturing the eruptive and disparate voices of a shifting American vernacular and its rippling effect on the way we communicate in our hyperkinetic time.

McClelland is most widely known for her deft use of linguistics and her sensually textured surfaces. She mines the ways in which communities speak, collecting language and choosing words that trend, are debated, heard on street corners, and absorbed from streaming news feeds; words that are rich in meaning, that reach and multiply, that drop in and out of everyday life. The words she selects hover between materials; letters press up against each other, run off the surface, join together, dissolve, loop, and collide into and onto themselves. Employing a wide range of materials, her compositions have a rhythm and beat as they perform, throb, and swagger, capturing the cadences of our speech, mimicking the physicality of how people express themselves. Pauses, utterances, and hysteria, the inflection of tone and the modulation of our tempo, bodily expressions and gesticulations, all are translated into painterly rhythmic compositions modeled after oratory repartee.

McClelland seizes these audible sensations, stealing words right out of the mouth, but also embodying our micro-expressions. In 2012, she began to incorporate numbers into her work as a reaction to the data onslaught of the Internet age. A mind-numbing rush of streaming lists for everything and anything are published on the Web. McClelland, a collector of messaging, in particular emotive and directional information, began researching the data that represents the individual and vice versa. This endless data stream is how twenty-first century society forecasts outcomes: from steady news spills that flood the imaginations, to engineering distorted images about identity and body type, and (in)forming biased estimates and postures. With the rise of social media as a primary source of content, opinion is now often misread as “news.”

This survey will include a seminal painting from the series Right (1993), originally shown as part of a group of paintings in the 1993 Whitney Biennial; the painting series Rap Sheet (2010-13), portraits of early female rap and hip hop artists during the “Roxanne Wars” in the Bronx; the painting series Action Objects (2010); paintings from the series Left (2011); the debut of three new paintings from the Before Tomorrow series (2015-16); and the premiere of a new site-engaged installation, third party (2016-17), which will incorporate materials such as glass, ceramic, and paint. Just Left Feel Right will also include many other never-before-exhibited works from past and current series.

Suzanne McClelland (b. 1959, Jacksonville, FL) received a BFA from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor 1981. She moved to New York that year and later attended the School of Visual Arts MFA program, graduating in 1989. McClelland’s work can be found in numerous public collections including the Brooklyn Museum, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, and the Whitney Museum of American Art. She lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a full-color, soft-cover scholarly publication, available during the exhibition, intended to serve as an enduring archival document and limited-edition artwork. It will include images of the works in the exhibition, a checklist, an essay by the curator, and a poster designed by the artist.

Organized by Amy Smith-Stewart, curator, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum.

For press inquiries, please contact Emily Devoe at 203.438.4519, extension 140, or edevoe@aldrichart.org

Generous funding for Suzanne McClelland: Just Left Feel Right is provided by Agnes Gund, GS Gives, Stephanie and Tim Ingrassia, James Cottrell and Joseph Lovett, Seymour and Carol Cole Levin, Carole Server and Oliver Frankel, and Thomson Family Philanthropy, NYC.

Major funding for exhibitions is provided by the Department of Economic and Community Development, Connecticut Office of the Arts; the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation; and Crozier. Additional support is provided by Hotel Zero Degrees, Danbury.

Exhibition

Virginia Overton

May 1, 2016, to February 5, 2017

Virginia Overton is a site-responsive artist. She makes sculptures, installations, photographs, and videos that relate to and interact with a venue’s architecture and defining landscape. Ultimately, what she achieves is work that is implicitly site referential, as she underscores an environment’s unassuming or extraordinary attributes by engaging the sensory features of the material.

Her sculptures and installations appear minimally composed, but their engagement with the features of a space—as well as its exterior and the landscape—generates a maximalist sensation from an efficiency of means. Performative by nature, her chosen materials are stimulated by the specificity of their situation; always initiated by the execution of a deliberate action, they maintain a relational experience predicated on a “being there” aesthetic.

Overton’s approach to the exhibition process is a combination of research and on-site decision making. For The Aldrich, she has created thirteen site-reactive sculptures and a video, presented inside the galleries, in the Sculpture Garden, and on the roofline. Each informs the other as the works reverberate throughout the building and boomerang out onto the grounds, offering multiple lines of sight. Many of the sculptures are composed of elements harvested from a dead eastern white pine felled on the Museum’s grounds. Some works feature indigenous materials scavenged on the premises alongside items Overton collected at the studio or recycled from past installations. Overton transposes the energy encapsulated within these objects, draining them of their normative purpose, and imparting them and their circumstances with a new functionality.

Whether reflecting the architectural features of a gallery or the contours of a natural landscape, Overton assesses the material—studying and learning its physical properties, seeing how far it can go, how much it can withstand—as it is processed through countless hours of experimentation. Once installed, her space-shifting sculptures and installations, through a process of re-articulation, demonstrate the inherent being-ness of an object, its materiality, its connection to a specific place at a particular time, inviting the viewer to navigate it anew as elements emerge and vanish from up close and at a distance.

- Amy Smith-Stewart, curator

Virginia Overton was born in 1971 in Nashville, Tennessee; she lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

Virginia Overton, Untitled (Suspended log), 2016; Courtesy of the artist

Generous support for Virginia Overton is provided by White Cube and Freymond-Guth Fine Arts, Zurich.

Exhibition

Kim Jones

White Crow

May 1, 2016, to February 5, 2017

During a career that now spans over four decades, Kim Jones has created a singular and subjective body of work based on both extreme personal experience and a wide range of artistic influences. Commentary about his work often dwells on details of his biography, which include surviving a severe childhood illness and serving in the Marines during the Vietnam War. These facts certainly have a bearing on understanding aspects of his output, but Jones’s life story has a tendency to induce a viewer to presuppose meaning prior to direct acquaintance, a situation that can limit interpretation. The artist’s history, however, has clearly led to his thinking of himself as an outsider, and this estrangement has been played out throughout his career with an interrelated series of performances, sculptures, drawings, and writings that are defined by a range of elemental and expressionistic impulses. The title of this exhibition, White Crow, refers to the extremely rare occurrence when a crow is born without any pigment in its plumage. This marks the bird as not only an outsider, but also, in folk mythology, as an omen of impending change. It should be noted that Jones thinks of White Crow, which includes some individual elements that Jones has worked on over a thirty-year period, as one continuous installation, echoing the importance of memory and the life he has lived in his practice as an artist.

In this exhibition, the crow and the rat (an animal that is featured in much of Jones’s work) appear repeatedly, connecting a series of indoor installations with what is one of the artist’s largest outdoor site-specific works to date. This installation, which was created during a ten-day residency at the Museum, involved the transformation of a grove of four small crabapple trees in front of The Aldrich into a festooned and wrapped sculpture. Additionally, Jones has utilized the Museum’s camera obscura, a small room that looks out towards the grove of crabapples, for an installation involving both sculpture and wall drawing. This includes the camera obscura’s projected image of the area around the trees, linking his intervention in the landscape with the indoor environment. It should be noted that the camera obscura is the only place in the exhibition where a white crow appears, perched in the center of the camera’s upside-down photographic image.

Included in White Crow, and augmented by a surrounding drawing done directly on the gallery wall, is one of Jones’s “war drawings,” a continuing series that he began as a teenager in the late 1950s. Jones didn’t show his war drawings for many years, tentatively exhibiting them for the first time in 1980. Obsessive and labyrinthine, these drawings evoke the diagrammatic battle drawings done by children with their aerial perspective, weapon trajectory lines, and geographical and architectural abstraction. True to his overall approach to art making, the war drawings are never finished (until they leave the artist’s possession), being worked and reworked over extended periods.

Comparing a war drawing with one of the artist’s spiky wood constructions, the viewer is struck by a formal similarity: an organization of space that is tentative, web-like, and subject to forces of both creation and destruction. Jones’s constructions resemble the primitive—yet strong—bamboo scaffolding that is used in Asia, or the protective, quill- covered back of a porcupine; they frequently have specific references to the body, including pantyhose-wrapped and painted elements that resemble viscera, and surfaces covered by crepuscular, biomorphic drawing.

Many of the sculptures in White Crow include children’s toys as elements, and one work, which is constructed on top of a “Big Wheel,” incorporates a group of toy soldiers that Jones played with as a child. In the Museum’s Sound Gallery, the artist has created a school classroom* of sorts: a strange tableau that reflects on his interest in blurring the boundaries between humankind and the natural world. This use of toys and the references to childhood point once more to the importance of memory and recollection in Jones’s work.

- Richard Klein, exhibitions director

Kim Jones was born in 1944 in San Bernardino, California; he lives and works in New York City.

Kim Jones, Untitled (Big Wheel), 1973-1985-1999; Courtesy of the artist and ZENO X GALLERY, Antwerp

Generous support for Kim Jones: White Crow is provided by ZENO X GALLERY, Antwerp, and JoAnn Gonzalez Hickey.

Exhibition

Peter Liversidge

Proposals for The Aldrich…

May 1, 2016, to February 5, 2017

For the past decade, Peter Liversidge’s practice has focused on the creation of conceptually based proposals that describe artworks that might—or might not—be realized. Typed on an Olivetti manual typewriter, these proposals—complete with typographical errors and hand annotations—describe ideas from the practical to the far-fetched. Liversidge wrote sixty proposals for The Aldrich (all of the typescripts are included in the exhibition), and twenty-three have been chosen for realization, guided by the concept of connecting the interior of The Aldrich Museum with both the surrounding landscape and the community. These include working with the employees of Ridgefield Hardware, the town’s hardware store, to write a song about the store that they will publically perform;* ring a cannonball into the Museum’s wall in reference to the action during the Revolutionary War that led to a British cannonball being embedded in the wall of the Keeler Tavern, Ridgefield’s Colonial-era historical site; and the fabrication of nine shallow, circular aluminum pans whose relative sizes correspond to the nine largest lakes in Connecticut, with the pans being subsequently filled with water from the specific lakes.

Liversidge’s way of working echoes some forms of conceptual art from the 1960s and 1970s in that the realization of his ideas is open to interpretation by others. He doesn’t confine his thought process to a limited range of media; rather, he allows his imagination free rein, believing that art can be made from almost any raw material or utilize almost any human activity. His physical works are usually created by simple, transitory actions; his performative works commonly utilize people who don’t think of themselves as performers.

The artist sees his proposals as gentle invitations, not explicit instructions—which is different from most art that is based on written directives—and the realization of a specific proposal is always open to negotiation, a fact that reveals his interest in expanding conventional notions of authorship. He is just as interested in the proposals that are not realized, as they are ready to be brought to life in the imagination of each reader. Liversidge’s work stands as a reminder that the execution of a simple idea can result in anything but a simple outcome.

Proposal No. 12, the installation of twelve groups of RGB (red, green, blue) lights in public locations in Ridgefield, is one of the artist’s proposals that has been realized. The Museum would like to thank the restaurants, shops, and other venues that have participated: The Ancient Mariner Restaurant, Books on the Common, Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage, Dog and Pony Restaurant, Guilded Lynx, Hutton’s Fine Menswear, Luc’s Café, Ridgefield Conservatory of Dance, Ridgefield Library, and Ridgefield Town Hall. Two of the groups have been installed at The Aldrich: one in the South Gallery and the other on the Museum’s porch.

- Richard Klein, exhibitions director

Peter Liversidge was born in 1973 in Lincoln, UK; he lives and works in London.

* The performance by the staff of Ridgefield Hardware will be part of a day of community activities at The Aldrich on July 9, which will also include the realization of Liversidge’s Proposal No. 17, the presentation of a free public meal that features sausages made to the artist’s grandfather’s recipe; and Proposal No. 51, the creation of a public sculpture by 100 Museum visitors out of 100 rolls of pennies.

Peter Liversidge, Proposal for The Aldrich Museum No. 20: Wooden Mail Objects, 2016; First group of objects posted to The Aldrich from London for installation on “postal shelf” in Museum; Courtesy of the artist and Sean Kelly Gallery, New York

Generous support for Peter Liversidge: Proposals for The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is provided by Sean Kelly Gallery, New York, and Francis H. Williams and Keris Salmon.

Exhibition

David Brooks

Continuous Service Altered Daily

May 1, 2016, to February 5, 2017


Continuous Service Altered Daily is a site-engaged sculptural array, or, as David Brooks refers to it, an “asteroid field without a distinctive beginning or end.” Brooks has disemboweled a beacon of agricultural technology, a 1976 John Deere 3300 series combine harvester, into hundreds of individual components, ranging from the iconic and specific to the common and standard. He has arranged every part, with not a single piece excluded, in an ambling procession that begins in the Museum’s front plaza, winds through the Atrium, front first-floor galleries, the inner courtyard, and ends in the Sculpture Garden. The project is understood as one continuous action that is expressed in a myriad of sculptural moments. From the macro to the micro, Brooks’s installation concurrently zooms in and out of view, wedging us inside the far off and the up close.

Brooks’s method of presentation offers the machine’s shell and innards in varying degrees of material transformation: 1) in its weathered condition, but with its trademark John Deere green still visible; 2) sandblasted to remove all evidence of wear and tear, returning the object back to its material origin; 3) brass plated; 4) powder coated, elevating the individualized status of the pieces as precious objects. Brooks uses the distinctive form and function of the disassembled combine analogously, allowing it to mirror the philosophical impasse at which we find ourselves as our hyperkinetic era faces an escalating ecological crisis.

The installation stages a metaphor. A combine harvester provides a quantifiable service: it reaps crops like grain and corn. Its individual elements and multitudinous functions are impossible to observe underneath its heavy metal shell, defying any one person’s perceptual capacity. Through an elaborate mechanization of moving parts it produces a product. Similarly, an ecosystem, representing a complex set of organisms and their environment functioning together, serves a life-sustaining purpose (clean air, food, energy, and filtered water) and is mistakenly likened to a mechanized instrument. Its interconnection to its natural environs and the greater planet is not only invisible, but promulgates a mistaken perception that these functions can be reduced to mere “services” available in perpetuity. Brooks makes a compelling visual correspondence here. He has chosen to group the machine parts into nine zones that represent nine ecosystem services that occur continuously in our biosphere and upon which we rely daily: water purification, pollination, disease regulation, decomposition, air purification, habitat formation, photosynthesis (primary production), ornamental resources, and erosion and flood control.

Continuous Service Altered Daily ultimately attempts to channel evolutionary time. A 1976 John Deere combine is a symbol of nineteenth-century innovation updated in a twentieth-century model. Brooks captures this progression through four stages of presentation, and thus likens it to the processes of interconnected life forms themselves. The wear and tear over its forty-year existence is self-evident in a rusty green corn head (past). The machine is then stripped of its lived history as its age is sandblasted away (present). Shiny objects with a fetish finish are re-presented as ornaments or modernist tabletop sculptures (future). But this is a temporal arrangement, one that marks time and space by compressing it within a schematic system that is itself impermanent.

- Amy Smith-Stewart, curator

David Brooks was born in 1975 in Brazil, Indiana; he lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

David Brooks, Disassembly of combine for Continuous Service Altered Daily, 2016; Photo by David Gelfman

Generous support for David Brooks: Continuous Service Altered Daily is provided by Brad and Sunny Goldberg.

Virginia Overton

Ridgefield, CT (May 2016): A monumental interactive tree swing is the focal point of The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum’s presentation of the work of Virginia Overton as part of Site Lines: Four Solo Exhibitions Engaging Place. The exhibition, which will be on view through February 5, 2017, presents Overton’s newly commissioned sculptures within the galleries, on the surrounding campus, and atop the Museum’s roof. Suspended on a free-standing steel armature, the swing is comprised of the approximately 12-foot-long debarked trunk of a felled eastern white pine tree from the Museum’s grounds. Other sculptural works were fabricated on-site during the installation period, incorporating elements harvested from the tree as well as items found around the Museum property and neighboring community. Perched on the Museum’s signature pitched roofline, which emulates the historic Colonial homes lining Main Street, is a newly commissioned weather vane, part of an ongoing series initiated by Overton in 2013.

Curator Amy Smith-Stewart describes Overton’s process, “Whether reflecting the architectural features of a gallery or the contours of a natural landscape, Overton physically wrangles her material—studying and learning its physical properties, seeing how far it can go, how much it can withstand—as it is processed through countless hours of experimentation. Once installed, her space-shifting sculptures and installations produce shadows, light leaks, and sound echoes that, through a process of re- articulation, demonstrate the inherent beingness of an object, its materiality, its connection to a specific place at a particular time, inviting the viewer to navigate it anew.” Overton (born 1971, Nashville, Tennessee) utilizes sculpture, installation, and photography to relate to and interact with a venue’s architecture and defining landscape. Her sculptures and interventions are made up of indigenous readymade objects and materials Overton scavenges from within the surrounding community. Growing up in the rural south on a Tennessee farm, Overton’s innate sensitivity to the land, and its inherent economic value, has instilled in her an intuitive understanding of the energetic potential to be harnessed and reaped from both her materials and her environment.

Generous support for Virginia Overton is provided by White Cube and Freymond-Guth Fine Arts, Zurich.

Site Lines: Four Solo Exhibitions Engaging Place

Virginia Overton is part of Site Lines: Four Solo Exhibitions Engaging Place, which opened with a public reception on May 1, 2106. This series of exhibitions also features David Brooks, Kim Jones, and Peter Liversidge, presenting site-specific commissions, ranging from sculpture to drawing and performance-based works. The exhibitions encompass both the monumental and the ephemeral, intersecting, interconnecting, or mirroring the Museum’s galleries and two-acre Sculpture Garden, as well as the surrounding community. The artists utilize materials found on or indigenous to the grounds and the area, offering a response to “site” that underscores the institution’s material history and its visual condition by transforming scale and circumstance. The works seek to “frame” the view within and beyond of the galleries against the natural landscape while also accentuating the Museum’s unique architectural features, such as a pitched roofline, paned windows, and a room-scale camera obscura. Viewers are able to respond to works from multiple vantage points as they move around the Museum’s galleries, grounds, and the surrounding environs. Gravel Mirror (1968), a work by the influential artist and writer Robert Smithson, incorporated gravel found on the grounds of The Aldrich, and was a significant touchstone for the development of this exhibition series.

Major funding for the Site Lines exhibitions is provided by the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation. Additional support is provided by Danbury Audi and DEDON.

CTC&G (Connecticut Cottages & Gardens) is the official media partner of the exhibition series.

The Artist

Overton was born in Nashville, Tennessee and lives and works in New York. Recent solo exhibitions include Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami in 2014, Storm King Art Center, Mountainville in 2014, Westfälischer Kunstverein, Munster in 2013-14, Kunsthalle Bern in 2013, The Power Station, Dallas in 2013, and The Kitchen, New York in 2012.

The Museum

Founded by Larry Aldrich in 1964, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is dedicated to fostering the work of innovative artists whose ideas and interpretations of the world around us serve as a platform to encourage creative thinking. It is the only museum in Connecticut devoted to contemporary art, and throughout its fifty- year history has engaged its community with thought-provoking exhibitions and public programs.

The Museum’s education and public programs are designed to connect visitors of all ages to contemporary art through innovative learning approaches in hands-on workshops, tours, and presentations led by artists, curators, Museum educators, and experts in related fields. Area schools are served by curriculum-aligned on-site and in-school programs, as well as teachers’ professional development training.

Supporters

The Aldrich, in addition to significant support from its Board of Trustees, receives contributions from many dedicated friends and patrons. Major funding for Museum programs and operations has been provided by the Department of Economic and Community Development, Connecticut Office of the Arts; the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation; the William Randolph Hearst Foundation; the Leir Charitable Foundations; The Goldstone Family Foundation; the Anne S. Richardson Fund; CTC&G (Connecticut Cottages & Gardens); The Pollock-Krasner Foundation, Inc.; The Coby Foundation; Fairfield Fine Art; The Cowles Charitable Trust; The Gage Fund; Fairfield County Bank; Tauck; and Cohen and Wolf.

WSHU Public Radio, TownVibe, and HamletHub are the official media partners of The Aldrich in 2016.

For additional information and images, please contact:

Emily Devoe
The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum
press@aldrichart.org
203.438.4519, extension 140

Peter Liversidge: Proposals for The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum

Ridgefield, CT (May 2016): For his first solo museum exhibition in the United States, currently on view at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, British artist Peter Liversidge wrote sixty proposals, including performances and physical artworks across a variety of mediums. Of these, twenty-four have been selected for realization and—with some help from local residents—will be presented at the Museum and in the surrounding neighborhood as part of Site Lines: Four Solo Exhibitions Engaging Place, which will be on view until February 5, 2017. For the past decade, Liversidge’s (born 1973, Lincoln, UK) practice has begun with the creation of conceptually based proposals. Typed on an old manual typewriter, these proposals—complete with typographical errors and hand annotations—describe ideas from the practical to the far-fetched. The chosen proposals, guided by the concept of connecting the interior of The Aldrich Museum with both the surrounding landscape and community, include working with the employees of Ridgefield Hardware to write a song about the store that they will publicly perform; firing a cannonball into the Museum’s wall in reference to the action during the Revolutionary War that led to a British cannonball being embedded in the wall of the Keeler Tavern, Ridgefield’s Colonial-era historical site; and the fabrication of nine shallow, circular aluminum pans whose relative sizes correspond to the nine largest lakes in Connecticut, with the pans being subsequently filled with water from the specific lakes.

Aldrich exhibitions director Richard Klein, the curator of the exhibition, explains, “Liversidge’s way of working echoes artists such as Sol LeWitt, in that his ideas are open to interpretation by others in the specific manner in which they are realized. Unlike LeWitt, however, he is anything but a formalist, engaging every conceivable approach to cultural production with an emphasis on ideas that are extremely accessible to the general public. Liversidge’s physical works are usually made of everyday materials or are created by simple, transitory actions and his performative works commonly utilize people who don’t think of themselves as performers. His work is a reminder that art can be created out of almost anything and that realizing a simple idea can result in anything but a simple outcome. Liversidge is just as interested in his proposals that are not realized, as they have their own life in each viewer’s imagination.”

Generous support for Peter Liversidge: Proposals for The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is provided by Sean Kelly Gallery, New York, and Francis H. Williams and Keris Salmon.

Site Lines: Four Solo Exhibitions Engaging Place

Peter Liversidge: Proposals for The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is part of Site Lines: Four Solo Exhibitions Engaging Place, which opened with a public reception on May 1, 2016. This series of exhibitions also features David Brooks, Kim Jones, and Virginia Overton, presenting site-specific commissions, ranging from sculpture to drawing and performance-based works. The exhibitions encompass both the monumental and the ephemeral, intersecting, interconnecting, or mirroring the Museum’s interior galleries and two-acre Sculpture Garden, as well as the surrounding community. The artists utilize materials found on or indigenous to the grounds and the area, offering a response to “site” that underscores the institution’s material history and its visual condition by transforming scale and circumstance. The works seek to “frame” the interiority of the galleries against the natural landscape while also accentuating the Museum’s unique architectural features, such as a pitched roofline, paned windows, and a room-scale camera obscura. Viewers are able to respond to works from multiple vantage points as they move around the Museum’s galleries, grounds, and the surrounding environs. Gravel Mirror (1968), a work by the influential artist and writer Robert Smithson, incorporated gravel found on the grounds of The Aldrich, and was a significant touchstone for the development of this exhibition series.

Major funding for the Site Lines exhibitions is provided by the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation. Additional support is provided by Danbury Audi and DEDON.

CTC&G (Connecticut Cottages & Gardens) is the official media partner of the exhibition series.

The Artist

Liversidge has worked with a diverse range of institutions, including the Tate Gallery, London in 2008, the Centre d’art Santa Mónica, Barcelona in 2008, Bloomberg SPACE, London in 2009, the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh in 2010, the Whitechapel Gallery in London in 2014 and most recently the Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven in 2015. He has also developed projects for the Europalia Festival in 2007, Edinburgh’s sculpture park, Jupiter Artland, in 2009, The Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh in 2010, the Armory Art Fair in 2011, and the Tate Modern, London in 2013. In 2012, Peter Liversidge began collaborating with Low, a band from Duluth, Minnesota, which ultimately resulted in Liversidge creating a backdrop for their international tour as well as several album covers and release proposals. In 2013 the Edinburgh Art Festival commissioned Liversidge’s Flags for Edinburgh, which toured to The MAC, Belfast in 2014. Peter Liversidge lives and works in London, England.

The Museum

Founded by Larry Aldrich in 1964, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is

dedicated to fostering the work of innovative artists whose ideas and interpretations of the world around us serve as a platform to encourage creative thinking. It is the only museum in Connecticut devoted to contemporary art, and throughout its fifty- year history has engaged its community with thought-provoking exhibitions and public programs.

The Museum’s education and public programs are designed to connect visitors of all ages to contemporary art through innovative learning approaches in hands-on workshops, tours, and presentations led by artists, curators, Museum educators, and experts in related fields. Area schools are served by curriculum-aligned on-site and in-school programs, as well as teachers’ professional development training.

Supporters

The Aldrich, in addition to significant support from its Board of Trustees, receives contributions from many dedicated friends and patrons. Major funding for Museum programs and operations has been provided by the Department of Economic and Community Development, Connecticut Office of the Arts; the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation; the William Randolph Hearst Foundation; the Leir Charitable Foundations; The Goldstone Family Foundation; the Anne S. Richardson Fund; CTC&G (Connecticut Cottages & Gardens); The Pollock-Krasner Foundation, Inc.; The Coby Foundation; Fairfield Fine Art; The Cowles Charitable Trust; The Gage Fund; Fairfield County Bank; Tauck; and Cohen and Wolf.

WSHU Public Radio, TownVibe, and HamletHub are the official media partners of The Aldrich in 2016.

For additional information and images, please contact:

Emily Devoe
The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum
press@aldrichart.org
203.438.4519, extension 140

David Brooks: Continuous Service Altered Daily

Ridgefield, CT (May 2016): Continuous Service Altered Daily, a major site-specific installation by David Brooks commissioned by The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, marks the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. Throughout his practice, Brooks investigates the tenuous relationship between our ecological life and technological industry.

Brooks (born 1975, Brazil, Indiana) presents every single part of a used 1976 John Deere 3300 combine harvester in his exhibition at The Aldrich, which will be on view through February 5, 2017. The components are laid out in varying degrees of disassembly in a procession from the front plaza through the Leir Atrium and Leir Gallery and out into the Museum’s Sculpture Garden. Distinctive elements like the corn head and cab remain unaltered in a weathered John Deere green, while other parts are sandblasted, removing rust, paint and all traces of wear and tear; still others, like pipes and fittings, are brass-plated and housed in museum vitrines, the traditional trappings of highbrow art objects or precious natural history displays.

A combine is the ultimate example of agricultural technology, the otherworldly design of its bulky metal body concealing the integration of all stages of the harvesting process into one machine designed to reap grain, a resource that the efficiency of a combine allows us to take for granted as eternally and inexpensively available.

Curator Amy Smith-Stewart explains, “The stunning array of dismantled machine parts, exhibited in a diverse system of presentation, are designated according to the ecosystem service they represent, making it impossible to conceive of the combine in its entirety or to determine the machine’s complete functionality; similarly, an ecosystem integrates innumerable processes, many of them intangible or undetectable, into one whole, making it impossible for us to conceive of a life unfolding within it.”

She continues, “Continuous Service Altered Daily asks us to reexamine our perception of products reaped from the landscape, oftentimes those too easily interpreted as “services” for personal use: water, food, clean air, climate, energy—things we have come to expect to be delivered to us forever.”

Generous support for David Brooks: Continuous Service Altered Daily is provided by Brad and Sunny Goldberg.

Site Lines: Four Solo Exhibitions Engaging Place

David Brooks: Continuous Service Altered Daily is part of Site Lines: Four Solo Exhibitions Engaging Place, which opened with a public reception on May 1, 2016. This series of exhibitions features Kim Jones, Peter Liversidge, and Virginia Overton, presenting site-specific commissions, ranging from sculpture to drawing and performance-based works. The exhibitions encompass both the monumental and the ephemeral, intersecting, interconnecting, or mirroring the Museum’s galleries and two-acre Sculpture Garden, as well as the surrounding community. The artists utilize materials found on or indigenous to the grounds and the area, offering a response to “site” that underscores the institution’s material history and its visual condition by transforming scale and circumstance. The works seek to “frame” the view within and beyond the galleries against the natural landscape while also accentuating the Museum’s unique architectural features, such as a pitched roofline, paned windows, and a room-scale camera obscura. Viewers are able to respond to works from multiple vantage points as they move around the Museum’s galleries, grounds, and the surrounding environs. Gravel Mirror (1968), a work by the influential artist and writer Robert Smithson, incorporated gravel found on the grounds of The Aldrich, and was a significant touchstone for the development of this exhibition series.

Major funding for the Site Lines exhibitions is provided by the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation. Additional support is provided by Danbury Audi and DEDON.

CTC&G (Connecticut Cottages & Gardens) is the official media partner of the exhibition series.

The Artist

David Brooks is a New York-based artist whose work investigates how cultural concerns cannot be divorced from the natural world, while also questioning the terms under which nature is perceived and utilized. Brooks has exhibited at the Dallas Contemporary; Tang Museum, New York; Nouveau Musée National de Monaco; Sculpture Center, New York; Miami Art Museum; Changwon Sculpture Biennale, South Korea; Galerie für Landschaftskunst, Germany; the Goethe-Institut, New York; and MoMA/PS1, New York, where he had a large-scale installation for two years. In 2011-12, Brooks opened Desert Rooftops in Times Square, a 5,000 square foot urban earthwork commissioned by the Art Production Fund. Other major commissions include Socrates Sculpture Park, New York; Storm King Art Center, New Windsor; the Cass Sculpture Foundation, United Kingdom; the deCordova Museum, Lincoln; and the Visual Arts Center, Austin. In 2010 he received a grant from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, and in 2012 a research grant to the Ecuadorian Amazon from the Coypu Foundation. Brooks attended the Städelschule, Staatliche Hochschule für Bildende Künste, Germany, and earned his BFA from the Cooper Union and MFA from Columbia University. He is currently on the faculty of the Maryland Institute College of Art.

The Museum

Founded by Larry Aldrich in 1964, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is dedicated to fostering the work of innovative artists whose ideas and interpretations of the world around us serve as a platform to encourage creative thinking. It is the only museum in Connecticut devoted to contemporary art, and throughout its fifty-year history has engaged its community with thought-provoking exhibitions and public programs.

The Museum’s education and public programs are designed to connect visitors of all ages to contemporary art through innovative learning approaches in hands-on workshops, tours, and presentations led by artists, curators, Museum educators, and experts in related fields. Area schools are served by curriculum-aligned on-site and in-school programs, as well as teachers’ professional development training.

Supporters

The Aldrich, in addition to significant support from its Board of Trustees, receives contributions from many dedicated friends and patrons. Major funding for Museum programs and operations has been provided by the Department of Economic and Community Development, Connecticut Office of the Arts; the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation; the William Randolph Hearst Foundation; the Leir Charitable Foundations; The Goldstone Family Foundation; the Anne S. Richardson Fund; CTC&G (Connecticut Cottages & Gardens); The Pollock-Krasner Foundation, Inc.; The Coby Foundation; Fairfield Fine Art; The Cowles Charitable Trust; The Gage Fund; Fairfield County Bank; Tauck; and Cohen and Wolf.

WSHU Public Radio, TownVibe, and HamletHub are the official media partners of The Aldrich in 2016.

For additional information and images, please contact:

Emily Devoe
The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum
press@aldrichart.org
203.438.4519, extension 140

Kim Jones:  White Crow

Ridgefield, CT (May 2016): Artist Kim Jones connects nature, culture, and memory through a material- and labor-intensive intervention into the galleries and surrounding landscape of The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum. His exhibition, White Crow, part of the presentation Site Lines: Four Solo Exhibitions Engaging Place, will be on view at the Museum until February 5, 2017.

Jones (born 1944, San Bernardino, California) has created a singular and subjective body of work based on extreme experiences that deeply affected his life and art making. He identifies himself as an outsider, and this estrangement has been played out through an interrelated series of performances, sculptures, drawings, and writings that exhibit a range of elemental and expressionistic impulses. White Crow refers to the extremely rare occurrence where a crow is born without any pigment in its plumage. This marks the bird as not only an outsider, but also, in folk mythology, as an omen of impending change.

Aldrich exhibitions director Richard Klein, the curator of the exhibition, explains: “Jones has often used stuffed animals and other toys as elements in his sculpture. The rat, which appears frequently, he identifies with as a species that, although usually reviled, is resourceful and intelligent, and lives in close association with human society. In this exhibition, the rat appears as a transitional element/figure, connecting a series of indoor sculptures with what will be the artist’s largest outdoor site-specific work to date. Many of the sculptures included in the exhibition are multi-media constructions that utilize wheeled toys, such as a “Big Wheel,” and their implied mobility suggest both the artist’s personal journey as well as the ad-hoc vehicle of the refugee.”

Jones’s life and work have been tempered by surviving a childhood illness, as well as serving in the Marines during the Vietnam War. The deep-seated memories of these experiences have created an undercurrent of survival in much of the artist’s work, and White Crow will expand this concern out into the landscape.

Klein continues, “Jones’s major outdoor installation, made during a two-week residency at the Museum, involves the transformation of a grove of four small crabapple trees into a group of festooned and wrapped sculptures. Additionally, he utilizes The Aldrich’s camera obscura, a small room that looks out on the grove of crabapples, by creating a wall drawing on the camera obscura’s projected image of the trees, linking his intervention in the landscape with the indoor environment.”

Generous support for Kim Jones: White Crow is provided by ZENO X GALLERY, Antwerp, and JoAnn Gonzalez Hickey.

Site Lines: Four Solo Exhibitions Engaging Place

Kim Jones: White Crow is part of Site Lines: Four Solo Exhibitions Engaging Place, which opened with a public reception on May 1, 2016. This series of exhibitions also features David Brooks, Peter Liversidge, and Virginia Overton, presenting site-specific commissions, ranging from sculpture to drawing and performance-based works. The exhibitions encompass both the monumental and the ephemeral, intersecting, interconnecting, or mirroring the Museum’s interior galleries and two-acre Sculpture Garden, as well as the surrounding community. The artists utilize materials found on or indigenous to the grounds and the area, offering a response to “site” that underscores the institution’s material history and its visual condition by transforming scale and circumstance. The works seek to “frame” the interiority of the galleries against the natural landscape while also accentuating the Museum’s unique architectural features, such as a pitched roofline, paned windows, and a room-scale camera obscura. Viewers are able to respond to works from multiple vantage points as they move around the Museum’s galleries, grounds, and the surrounding environs. Gravel Mirror (1968), a work by the influential artist and writer Robert Smithson, incorporated gravel found on the grounds of The Aldrich, and was a significant touchstone for the development of this exhibition series.

Major funding for the Site Lines exhibitions is provided by the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation. Additional support is provided by Danbury Audi and DEDON.

CTC&G (Connecticut Cottages & Gardens) is the official media partner of the exhibition series.

The Artist

Kim Jones was born in San Bernardino in 1944 and lives and works in New York. For over thirty years he has been working on a consistent oeuvre of drawings, sculptures, and performances—war drawings, rat sculptures, combat vehicles, and performances as his alter ego Mudman—that all have their origin in his personal experience, including his participation as a soldier in the Vietnam War and the illness that kept him in a wheelchair between the ages of seven and ten. Jones’s work has been featured in significant group exhibitions, including Kim Jones: A Retrospective, UB Art Gallery, The State University of New York, Buffalo, and the Luckman Fine Arts Complex, California State University, Los Angeles; the 17th Sidney Biennale; The Third Mind: American Artists Contemplate Asia, Guggenheim Museum, New York; the 52nd Venice Biennial; Disparities & Deformations: Our Grotesque, Site Santa Fe; Out of Actions: Between Performance and the Object, Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles; and Mapping at The Museum of Modern Art, New York; amongst others. Jones’s work is held in major museum collections, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.

The Museum

Founded by Larry Aldrich in 1964, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is

dedicated to fostering the work of innovative artists whose ideas and interpretations of the world around us serve as a platform to encourage creative thinking. It is the only museum in Connecticut devoted to contemporary art, and throughout its fifty- year history has engaged its community with thought-provoking exhibitions and public programs.

The Museum’s education and public programs are designed to connect visitors of all ages to contemporary art through innovative learning approaches in hands-on workshops, tours, and presentations led by artists, curators, Museum educators, and experts in related fields. Area schools are served by curriculum-aligned on-site and in-school programs, as well as teachers’ professional development training.

Supporters

The Aldrich, in addition to significant support from its Board of Trustees, receives contributions from many dedicated friends and patrons. Major funding for Museum programs and operations has been provided by the Department of Economic and Community Development, Connecticut Office of the Arts; the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation; the William Randolph Hearst Foundation; the Leir Charitable Foundations; The Goldstone Family Foundation; the Anne S. Richardson Fund; CTC&G (Connecticut Cottages & Gardens); The Pollock-Krasner Foundation, Inc.; The Coby Foundation; Fairfield Fine Art; The Cowles Charitable Trust; The Gage Fund; Fairfield County Bank; Tauck; and Cohen and Wolf.

WSHU Public Radio, TownVibe, and HamletHub are the official media partners of The Aldrich in 2016.

For additional information and images, please contact:

Emily Devoe
The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum
press@aldrichart.org
203.438.4519, extension 140

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Family Partner

$1,000

$1,000 ($900 tax deductible)

Special Summer Offer! Join by August 31, 2017 and add two free months to your annual membership and receive a signed Tony Matelli limited-edition poster. PLUS, receive summer discounts at the following
Ridgefield establishments:

Bailey’s Backyard*
The Cake Box* (excluding cake and event orders)
Swoon* (excluding cake and event orders)
Terra Restaurant, Danbury**

*10% off bill before tax. Tuesdays through Thursdays only.
** 20% off lunch bill before tax. Not valid on holidays. May not be combined with prix fixe lunch.

A summer promotion card will accompany membership cards. Promotion card must be presented at each location to receive your one-time discount. Promotion and discounts valid through August 31, 2017.

Family Partner Benefits:

  • Unlimited admission per cardholder
  • $5 guest admission
  • Invitations to members-only events
  • Complimentary exhibition catalogues
  • Fairfield/Westchester Museum Alliance reciprocal benefits*
  • Priority registration and program discounts
  • Free admission to curator and artist-led family tours
  • Unlimited admission for immediate family
  • 10% discount on Camp Aldrich
  • Early access to tickets and special pricing for premier social gatherings
  • Exclusive pre-event experiences at social gatherings
  • Reciprocal benefits to over 900 museums in North America**
  • 10% discount of children’s birthday party
  • Acknowledgment on donor wall and website
  • Four guest passes
  • New Benefit – Free admission for two adults and up to 4 children (17 and younger) to Storm King Art Center in New Windsor, NY. (Members must show their Aldrich membership cards and photo ID’s)

*Bruce Museum, The Barnum Museum, Hudson River Museum, Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, Katonah Museum, Neuberger Museum of Art,Wave Hill

** To view participating North American Reciprocal Museums, click here

**To view participating Modern and Contemporary Reciprocal Museums, click here

If you prefer, please mail a check made payable to The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, 258 Main Street, Ridgefield, CT 06877. For further assistance, contact Kathryn Tufano, Senior Development Officer,
at ktufano@aldrichart.org, or 203.438.4519 x148.

Educator (Pre-K – higher education with a school ID)

FREE

Special Summer Offer! Join by August 31, 2017 and add two free months to your annual membership! PLUS, receive summer discounts at the following Ridgefield establishments:

Bailey’s Backyard*
The Cake Box* (excluding cake and event orders)
Swoon* (excluding cake and event orders)
Terra Restaurant, Danbury**

*10% off bill before tax. Tuesdays through Thursdays only.
** 20% off lunch bill before tax. Not valid on holidays. May not be combined with prix fixe lunch.

A summer promotion card will accompany membership cards. Promotion card must be presented at each location to receive your one-time discount. Promotion and discounts valid through August 31, 2017.

Educator Benefits:

  • Unlimited admission per cardholder
  • $5 guest admission
  • Invitations to members-only events
  • Complimentary exhibition catalogues
  • Fairfield/Westchester Museum Alliance reciprocal benefits*
  • Priority registration and program discounts
  • Early access to tickets and special pricing for premier social gatherings
  • Free admission to curator and artist-led family tours

*Bruce Museum, The Barnum Museum, Hudson River Museum, Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, Katonah Museum, Neuberger Museum of Art, Wave Hill

Painting In Four Takes

Hayal Pozanti, 18, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Jessica Silverman Gallery, San Francisco
Hayal Pozanti, 18, 2015. Courtesy of the artist and Jessica Silverman Gallery, San Francisco


Ridgefield, CT (September 2015):

The last one hundred years have witnessed the explosion of virtually every available means and medium in the service of art making, yet painting has not only maintained a central position in visual art, but has also adapted creatively to rapid changes in our culture as a whole. Today, painting is embedded in the broad debate of actual vs. virtual, and its ability to balance what is illusive and what is real, what is tactile and what is optical, and what is emotive and what is formal, providing fertile ground for a diverse range of artists.

This fall, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield, Connecticut, will present Painting in Four Takes, a series of solo exhibitions that will provide a window into the practices of four engaging painters who imbue the medium with relevance and character. The series, on view from November 15, 2015, through April 3, 2016, will mark the first time in over twenty years that The Aldrich has dedicated all of its galleries to painting.

“While some point to marketability as the basis for the unwavering position of painting as a leading visual arts medium, for many artists, painting provides the most relevant platform for expression, allowing for both the potential of innovation and deep historical continuity,” says Richard Klein, The Aldrich’s exhibitions director.

Aldrich curator Amy Smith-Stewart explains, “The four artists selected span generations, methods, and intentions, but all are deeply entrenched in what painting is and can be in the image-dominated atmosphere of our twenty-first century.”

The four exhibitions will be celebrated at a free opening reception from 2 to 5 pm on Sunday, November 15, to which the public is invited.

Steve DiBenedetto: Evidence of Everything

In a career that spans three decades, Steve DiBenedetto (b. 1958, Bronx, New York) has established himself as an idiosyncratic artist who has brought the pursuit of painting into the unpredictable chaos and flux that categorize the Post-Modern world. Evidence of Everything is his first major solo museum exhibition.

DiBenedetto has consistently rejected formalism throughout an era where both formal and conceptual approaches to painting have become de rigueur, taking

a position where the canvas and the act of painting initiate a site for struggle, invention, and, ultimately, reinvention. Utilizing an inventory of leitmotifs, including the helicopter, octopus, wheel, and glass office tower, DiBenedetto paints and repaints his subjects in states of apocalyptic trauma where content and technique become unified, while the boundaries between the objective and subjective become uncertain. The artist’s work has prophetic, philosophical, and mystical undercurrents, with imagery often forming geometric webs or mandala-like vortices that tear themselves apart only to recongeal in thick, spectral passages of paint. Through his work, DiBenedetto has cast himself as a kind of baroque symbolist, working in the deep tradition of European Romanticism, with his excesses tempered by a terrible, yet transcendental beauty. “You never know what is enough,” wrote William Blake, “unless you know what is more than enough.” Marked by both foresight and revelation, DiBenedetto’s painting exists in a continuum that flows from Blake to speculative novelist William Gibson.

Steve DiBenedetto: Evidence of Everything has been organized by Aldrich exhibitions director Richard Klein.

Hayal Pozanti: Deep Learning

The practice of Hayal Pozanti (b. 1983, Istanbul, Turkey) spans painting, digital animation, and sculpture. For her first solo museum exhibition, she will debut a new series of paintings and digital animations. Pozanti negotiates two opposing image- producing interfaces, the digital, with its mechanical, frenetic pace, and traditional studio practice, with its slowness, imperfection, and tactile insistence. To do so, she has invented “Instant Paradise”: a thirty-one-character “alphabet,” which she uses to generate shapes that never repeat themselves, nor have a recognizable equivalent in visual culture. Embedded within these shapes are bundles of mined data relating to the impact of contemporary technological developments on human lives. Through this process, Pozanti acts as a digital-to-analog encryption system so as to preserve information that could be lost or altered in the cloud. Her movement, from freehand to track pad, reinforces her intent, so that the final composition is equally successful online and in person. Alongside her paintings, and sometimes shown side by side, she creates digital animations, both informed by her back and forth translation of mechanical and digital processes and her desire for the means via which they are seen to be interchangeable, non hierarchical, and streamlined.

Hayal Pozanti: Deep Learning has been organized by Aldrich curator Amy Smith- Stewart.

Julia Rommel: Two Italians, Six Lifeguards

For her first solo museum exhibition, Julia Rommel (b. 1980, Salisbury, Maryland) will debut a series of new paintings presented alongside small works from 2010– 2012. Rommel’s oil paintings range from head to body size, and oscillate between cool and warm palettes, color fields of denim blues, moody greys, creamy whites, salmon pinks, and citrus hues. All are intimately connected to their edges, as they are stretched and re-stretched numerous times over the course of their making in

a physical wrangle of layering and effacing. As with a haiku, Rommel’s seemingly accessible surfaces belie their mysterious complexity, involving a laborious choreography of cutting, sanding, wiping, expunging, and overlaying, as the build-up and break down of the composition both reveals and disguises a history of choices and decisions, giving the paintings a rhythm and expression not unlike a life cycle. Taken in concert, Rommel’s stressed surfaces, with their bends, folds, cracks, frayed edges, and staple holes, have a vitality that connects them to the viewer— and the viewer to the works—in various stages of being and becoming.

Julia Rommel: Two Italians, Six Lifeguards, has been organized by Aldrich curator Amy Smith-Stewart.

Ruth Root: Old, Odd, and Oval

Old, Odd, and Oval will be Ruth Root’s (b. 1967, Chicago, Illinois) first solo museum exhibition in the United States. Root’s practice centers on an intensive investigation of color, material, form, and support. For more than two decades, she has worked within the language of abstract painting, exploring the physical and illusory boundary of wall and object, foreground and background, even inventing her own color wheel to challenge canonized color theory. Old, Odd, and Oval, will focus on her latest body of work, medium- to large-scale to site-engaged paintings that demonstrate her experimentations with new materials and fabrication methods as she combines hand-painted Plexiglas with colorful fabric patterns she designs digitally. Alongside these new works, The Aldrich will present an intimate salon-style hanging of Root’s painted paper collages, initiated in 1998, to demonstrate her advancing investigation of color, pattern, and composition as noted influencers of what was to come (evidenced by the new works in the adjacent galleries). These small, shaped, works on paper are geometric abstractions that feature quirky cartoonish elements to rupture color fields—madcap flourishes humanizing pure abstract reduction.

Ruth Root: Old, Odd, and Oval organized by Aldrich curator Amy Smith-Stewart.

Publications

Each exhibition will be accompanied by a free, fully illustrated, full-color publication with an essay by the curator. Ruth Root’s publication will include an artist-designed takeaway: a limited-edition bookmark. Root began making the bookmarks when she had finished a large body of work and was trying to restart her practice by reading art books, bookmarking images as she read. She explains, “Somehow, my old drawings that were pieced from painted paper and printed scraps were around the studio and started to be used to bookmark oversized art books, then the bookmarks became a project of their own. It was as if these huge monumental paintings became smaller and elongated, functional and bookmarking other things that I wanted to think about or incorporate into my work.”

About the Museum

Founded by Larry Aldrich in 1964, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is dedicated to fostering the work of pioneering artists whose interpretations of the world around us serve as a platform to encourage creative thinking. The Aldrich is one of the few independent, non-collecting contemporary art museums in the United States and the only museum in Connecticut devoted to contemporary art, and engages its diverse audiences with thought-provoking, interdisciplinary exhibitions and programs.

The Museum’s education and public programs are designed to connect visitors of all ages to contemporary art through innovative learning approaches in hands-on workshops, tours, and presentations led by artists, curators, Museum educators, and experts in related fields. Area schools are served by curriculum-aligned on-site and in-school programs, as well as teachers’ professional development training.

Supporters

Generous support for exhibitions has been provided by The Coby Foundation, Jennifer and Claude Amadeo, Valerie and Greg Jensen, Andrew Kreps Gallery, and the Patrons Circle.

The Aldrich, in addition to significant support from its Board of Trustees, receives contributions from many dedicated friends and patrons. Major funding for Museum programs and operations has been provided by the Department of Economic and Community Development, Connecticut Office of the Arts; the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation; the William Randolph Hearst Foundation; the Leir Charitable Foundations; The Goldstone Family Foundation; the Anne S. Richardson Fund; the National Endowment for the Arts; the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, Inc.; The Coby Foundation; JoyRide Ridgefield; Newman’s Own Foundation; the SAHA Association; Fairfield Fine Art; The Cowles Charitable Trust; The Gage Fund; Fairfield County Bank; Fairfield County’s Community Foundation; Ridgefield Education Foundation; and Cohen and Wolf.

HamletHub; TownVibe, publishers of <i>Ridgefield Magazine</i>; and WSHU Public Radio are the official media sponsors of The Aldrich in 2015.

For additional information and images, please contact:

Kris Honeycutt
The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum press@aldrichart.org
203.438.4519, extension 125

Exhibition

Steve DiBenedetto

Evidence of Everything

November 15, 2015, to April 3, 2016

In a career that spans three decades, Steve DiBenedetto (b. 1958, Bronx, New York) has established himself as an idiosyncratic artist who has brought the pursuit of painting into the unpredictable chaos and flux that categorize the Post-Modern world. Evidence of Everything is his first major solo museum exhibition. DiBenedetto has consistently rejected formalism throughout an era where both formal and conceptual approaches to painting have become de rigueur, taking a position where the canvas and the act of painting initiate a site for struggle, invention, and, ultimately, reinvention. Utilizing an inventory of leitmotifs, including the helicopter, octopus, wheel, and glass office tower, DiBenedetto paints and repaints his subjects in states of apocalyptic trauma where content and technique become unified, while the boundaries between the objective and subjective become uncertain. The artist’s work has prophetic, philosophical, and mystical undercurrents, with imagery often forming geometric webs or mandala-like vortices that tear themselves apart only to recongeal in thick, spectral passages of paint. Through his work, DiBenedetto has cast himself as a kind of baroque symbolist, working in the deep tradition of European Romanticism, with his excesses tempered by a terrible, yet transcendental beauty. “You never know what is enough,” wrote William Blake, “unless you know what is more than enough.” Marked by both foresight and revelation, DiBenedetto’s painting exists in a continuum that flows from Blake to speculative novelist William Gibson. Curated by Richard Klein

Steve DiBenedetto, Captured Shadow, 2005
Hall Collection

Exhibition

Hayal Pozanti

Deep Learning

November 15, 2015, to April 3, 2016

The practice of Hayal Pozanti (b. 1983, Istanbul, Turkey) spans painting, digital animation, and sculpture. For her first solo museum exhibition, she will debut a new series of paintings and digital animations. Pozanti negotiates two opposing image-producing interfaces, the digital, with its mechanical, frenetic pace, and traditional studio practice, with its slowness, imperfection, and tactile insistence. To do so, she has invented “Instant Paradise”: a thirty-one-character “alphabet,” which she uses to generate shapes that never repeat themselves, nor have a recognizable equivalent in visual culture. Embedded within these shapes are bundles of mined data relating to the impact of contemporary technological developments on human lives. Through this process, Pozanti acts as a digital-to-analog encryption system so as to preserve information that could be lost or altered in the cloud. Her movement, from freehand to track pad, reinforces her intent, so that the final composition is equally successful online and in person. Alongside her paintings, and sometimes shown side by side, she creates digital animations, both informed by her back and forth translation of mechanical and digital processes and her desire for the means via which they are seen to be interchangeable, non hierarchical, and streamlined. Curated by Amy Smith-Stewart

Hayal Pozanti, 18, 2015
Courtesy of the artist and Jessica Silverman Gallery, San Francisco

Exhibition

Julia Rommel

Two Italians, Six Lifeguards

November 15, 2015, to April 3, 2016

For her first solo museum exhibition, Julia Rommel (b. 1980, Salisbury, Maryland) will debut a series of new paintings presented alongside small works from 2010 to 2012. Rommel’s oil paintings range from head to body size, and oscillate between cool and warm palettes, color fields of denim blues, moody greys, creamy whites, salmon pinks, and citrus hues. All are intimately connected to their edges, as they are stretched and re-stretched numerous times over the course of their making in a physical wrangle of layering and effacing. As with a haiku, Rommel’s seemingly accessible surfaces belie their mysterious complexity, involving a laborious choreography of cutting, sanding, wiping, expunging, and overlaying, as the build-up and break down of the composition both reveals and disguises a history of choices and decisions, giving the paintings a rhythm and expression not unlike a life cycle. Taken in concert, Rommel’s stressed surfaces, with their bends, folds, cracks, frayed edges, and staple holes, have a vitality that connects them to the viewer—and the viewer to the works—in various stages of being and becoming. Curated by Amy Smith-Stewart

Generous support for this exhibition has been provided by The Coby Foundation.

Julia Rommel, Moroccan Boyfriend, 2015
Courtesy of the artist and Bureau, New York

Manager of Academic Programs

SUPERVISOR: Director of Public Programs & Audience Engagement

STATUS: Full time

About The Aldrich:

It is the mission of The Aldrich to advance creative thinking by connecting today’s artists with individuals and communities in unexpected and stimulating ways. It is the mission of the Public Programs and Education department of The Aldrich to foster direct interaction with contemporary art and artists, inspire and nurture ideas that cultivate critical and creative thinking, encourage curiosity and reflection, and create transformative learning experiences. The studio practices of the Museum’s exhibiting artists inspire our laboratory approach to learning, which engages diverse communities of children, teens, adults, seniors, families, educators, and artists. Founded by Larry Aldrich in 1964, The Aldrich is dedicated to fostering innovative artists whose ideas and interpretations of the world around us serve as a platform for dialogue and learning. First located in a landmark 1783 house on Ridgefield’s historic Main Street, used today for administrative offices, the galleries have since 2004 been housed in an AIA-award-winning 25,000 square-foot facility. The Aldrich is one of the few independent, non-collecting contemporary art museums in the United States, the only museum in Connecticut devoted to contemporary art, and one of just twenty museums in Connecticut and 318 art museums in the country to be accredited by the American Alliance of Museums.

The Aldrich has a 50-year track record of identifying and supporting significant artists at seminal moments in their development and interpreting their work for a broad and cross-generational public, and a history of engaging the community through exhibitions that investigate current cultural and societal issues as well as complementary art-making workshops and thought-provoking interdisciplinary programs. The ideas motivating the artists, and how their concepts and endeavors are presented to diverse audiences, define the activities and character of the Museum.

Position Overview:

The Manager of Academic Programs (Manager) reports to and works closely with the Director of Public Programs and Audience Engagement (Director), to research, develop, implement and assess pioneering programs for schools, educators, and the adult volunteer Museum Guide team.

The Manager will develop innovative, forward thinking strategies that increase service to regional schools and educators, and position The Aldrich as a leader in the field of museum education. These strategies and the resulting programs will be developed in dialogue with administrators, educators, and curriculum specialists from the schools and districts served by The Aldrich. The Manager will develop an annual plan for assessing the short- and long-term impact of the Museum’s education programs on the students and teachers served. The Manager will be knowledgeable about trends and approaches in the field of museum education and will make recommendations for program change and/or growth within her/his area of responsibility to the Director, Executive Director, Board of Directors, and Board Committees as needed.

The Manager will maintain an active, productive, and communicative relationship with area educators, administrators, parents, regional arts and culture institutions, arts education organizations, and other institutions and individuals whose mission it is to serve students and teachers. The Manager will position The Aldrich as a primary resource for students and teachers, incorporating all subject areas in programmatic offerings and materials, and will serve as the Museum’s expert on Common Core, STEM to STEAM, and other issues, policies and programs that impact and effect schools and teachers.

In keeping with the collaborative and cooperative structure of the Public Programs and Education department, the Manager will work in partnership with the Manager of Education Programs and Youth Initiatives to (1) develop pilot programs for all audiences; (2) develop and foster key partnerships with schools, school districts, teachers, school administrators, and community and peer organizations; (3) develop interpretive content for programs for all visitors, including but not limited to lesson plans for school groups, family gallery guides, and adult tour scripts; and (4) train the Museum Guide team.

The Manager will maintain a current mailing list of regional educators and administrators, and will organize and manage programs and events within her/his area of responsibility, including but not limited to Teacher Advisory Committee meetings, Museum Guide meetings and trainings, culminating program receptions, peer group forums, and professional development opportunities for educators and administrators.

The Manager will develop and maintain a professional team of Museum Guides who are prepared to serve as museum ambassadors and gallery educators, equipped with the most current and relevant understanding of museum education theory and practice.

The Manager will foster and participate in the department’s and the Museum’s collaborative culture, and will work in partnership with the Director and other departments as needed to develop, implement, promote, and assess public programs and strategic community partnerships.

Responsibilities will include, but are not limited to: Experience and Skills: The successful candidate is an innovative thinker and dynamic leader with a minimum of 5 years experience working in a museum, art center, or similar setting with docent volunteers, as well as demonstrable excellence in teaching K-12 school and educator audiences with original works of art in a museum or gallery setting. The candidate will have experience developing fundable, innovative school and teacher programs, setting strategic goals for programs and prioritizing tasks to support these goals, and implementing and evaluating such programs. The successful candidate is a self-motivated individual who excels in a fast-paced creative environment and thinks both strategically and logistically. The candidate will possess excellent organizational and communication skills, and provide evidence of well-developed collaborative skills and experience leading teams through complex projects. The exceptional candidate will have demonstrable experience in developing public programs for all ages, including youth, family and adult. Experience working with artists and in artist-driven programs and audience engagement required.

  • Develop annual strategies for new programs, existing program growth and revision, assessment, and student and teacher audience development
  • Manage all aspects of school programs (grades K-12, and university level) including program development, administration, scheduling, transportation, curriculum development, training of Museum staff and Guides, and annual assessment
  • Manage all aspects of Teacher Professional Development programs including program development, administration, scheduling, content development, and annual assessment
  • Manage Teacher Advisory Committee, including recruitment
  • Manage all aspects of the Museum Guide program, including administration, scheduling, content development, recruitment and training, and annual assessment of the individual docents and overall program
  • Work proactively and collaboratively with teachers and administrators in program development to assure Museum programs and curricula support and meet the changing needs of the education community
  • Develop and manage community partnerships as assigned
  • Attend weekly departmental meetings and participate in collaborative process to develop hands-on projects for the Education Center and interpretive and visitor experience tools for the galleries
  • Develop and manage annual program budgets
  • Assist in the research and development of funding proposals for school, teacher and docent programs
  • Assist in writing interpretative materials including wall texts, labels, family guides and website content
  • Work with Director on strategic planning for department, including mission and vision statements and goals
  • Other or additional duties as assigned in accordance with the job title

Knowledge and Education: A Masters Degree in art history, art education, museum education or a related field is preferred. The successful candidate will demonstrate knowledge of contemporary art, museum program management, K-12 education, National Learning Standards, Common Core State Standards, and the STEM to STEAM initiative. Familiarity with Connecticut and Westchester school districts is preferred. Please send (1) a cover letter including salary requirements, (2) current resume, and (3) a description of a program for K-12 students designed, implemented, and evaluated by the applicant to: jobs@aldrichart.org, and note “Manager of Academic Programs” in the subject line. Calls will not be accepted. Only qualified applicants will be contacted. The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is committed to: Consistent with these principles, The Aldrich does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, expression and characteristics, age, religion, national or ethnic origin, visible or invisible disability, veteran status, or any other protected status.

Application Process:

The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum Non-Discrimination Policy

  • The goal of achieving equal opportunity for all.
  • Providing an inclusive and welcoming environment for all members of the community.
  • Providing an inclusive and nondiscriminatory work environment in which all employees are valued and empowered to succeed.
  • Providing a workplace free from harassment of all kinds.
  • Compliance with all federal and state legislation and regulations regarding non-discrimination.

Exhibition

Virginia Poundstone

Flower Mutations

May 3, 2015, to October 25, 2015

Virginia Poundstone’s practice spans photography, sculpture, video, and installation, and is exclusively focused on the history and botany of the flower and its socio-economic and cultural significance. Her exhibition at The Aldrich is dedicated to two important sources of inspiration: Giacomo Balla’s series of Futurist Flowers and traditional American flower-pattern quilts. Poundstone debuts a new outdoor sculpture, Quilt Square (Tulip) (2015), and an earthwork, Tulips (2014–15), on the Museum’s grounds; in an interior room, artworks and objects investigate the visual representation of flowers through abstraction in art and design. The outdoor sculpture, a geometric flower in stone and glass, is based on the geometry of a traditional quilt pattern. Placed in the interior courtyard, where it is visible from within the Museum’s Leir Atrium, it is seen for a fleeting period in relation to a field of colorful tulips (more than three thousand bulbs were planted in eight dynamic hues) that form a resplendent garden across the sloping grassy embankment. Inside the Museum’s expansive Project Space and Balcony Gallery, visitors encounter a new glass sculpture by Poundstone, as well as a monumental wall print of Rainbow Rose (2013), alongside seminal inspirational works by artists that span generations and art historical movements. Adjacent to these influential works, on loan from institutions around the country, she also includes objects from her own collection.

Amy Smith-Stewart, curator

Virginia Poundstone was born in 1977 in Great Lakes, Illinois, and lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

Virginia Poundstone, Rainbow Rose, 2013Courtesy of the artist

Circumstance highlights inspiration and its influence across object- making, through the specifically commissioned work of six multi- generational artists. The exhibitions underscore the intersection of installation art and exhibition design, and show how the convergence of fine art, design, and non-art objects within the exhibition format informs and elucidates creative expression. For six months, the entire museum facility — whose distinctive galleries range from the intimate to the spacious — will be transformed into “rooms” designed by the exhibiting artists, which will “read” as total works of art as they show their own work alongside objects and/or artworks by other artists they have selected. In some instances, works may extend outside of the Museum’s walls, providing alternative ways of perceiving space by offering extended lines of sight across the campus. In doing so, Circumstance attempts to explore the interstices where art and object come together, come apart, and reunify, by examining context, its many shifts and permutations, and tracing the movement of art and objects from the studio to the museum. In the captivating maze of intersecting rooms, craft, found, utilitarian, historical design, and everyday objects will sit beside works of art, informing us as to how artists take inspiration from what is around them. Selected artworks and objects will enhance our “reading” and innovatively offer—vis-à-vis a visual form of storytelling—intersecting and interdynamic narratives about these works of art and their makers, confronting us with larger questions about history, culture, and society. Participating artists Virginia Poundstone, Nancy Shaver, Ruby Sky Stiler, Penelope Umbrico, Elif Uras, and B. Wurtz will take center stage in the development, conceptualization, and reception of their work, as the Museum assists them to reveal never-before-seen aspects of their practice.

Exhibition

Ruth Root

Old, Odd, and Oval

November 15, 2015, to April 3, 2016

Old, Odd, and Oval will be Ruth Root’s (b. 1967, Chicago) first solo museum exhibition in the United States. Root’s practice centers on an intensive investigation of color, material, form, and support. For more than two decades, she has worked within the language of abstract painting, exploring the physical and illusory boundary of wall and object, foreground and background, even inventing her own color wheel to challenge canonized color theory. Old, Odd, and Oval, will focus on her latest body of work, medium- to large-scale to site-engaged paintings that demonstrate her experimentations with new materials and fabrication methods as she combines hand-painted Plexiglas with colorful fabric patterns she designs digitally. Alongside these new works, The Aldrich will present an intimate salon-style hanging of Root’s painted paper collages, initiated in 1998, to demonstrate her advancing investigation of color, pattern, and composition as noted influencers of what was to come (evidenced by the new works in the adjacent galleries). These small, shaped, works on paper are geometric abstractions that feature quirky cartoonish elements to rupture color fields—madcap flourishes humanizing pure abstract reduction. Curated by Amy Smith-Stewart

Ruth Root: Old, Odd, and Oval

November, 2015

Image: Ruth Root, Untitled, 2013
Courtesy of the artist and Bureau, New York

Ridgefield, CT (September 2015): The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum will present Old, Odd, and Oval, the first solo museum exhibition in the United States by Chicago-born artist Ruth Root, from November 15, 2015, through April 3, 2016.

Root’s practice centers on an intensive investigation of color, material, form, and support. For more than two decades, she has worked within the language of abstract painting, exploring the physical and illusory boundary of wall and object, foreground and background, even inventing her own color wheel to challenge canonized color theory. Old, Odd, and Oval, part of the Painting in Four Takes series of exhibitions, will focus on her latest body of work, medium- to large-scale to site-engaged paintings that demonstrate her experimentations with new materials and fabrication methods as she combines hand-painted Plexiglas with colorful fabric patterns she designs digitally. Alongside these new works, The Aldrich will present an intimate salon-style hanging of Root’s painted paper collages, initiated in 1998, to demonstrate her advancing investigation of color, pattern, and composition as noted influencers of what was to come (evidenced by the new works in the adjacent galleries). These small, shaped, works on paper are geometric abstractions that feature quirky cartoonish elements to rupture color fields—madcap flourishes humanizing pure abstract reduction.

Ruth Root: Old, Odd, and Oval, organized by Aldrich curator Amy Smith-Stewart, is generously supported by The Coby Foundation.

Painting in Four Takes

Ruth Root: Old, Odd, and Oval is part of Painting in Four Takes, a series of solo exhibitions that will provide a window into the practices of four engaging painters who imbue the medium with relevance and character. In addition to Root, Steve DiBenedetto, Hayal Pozanti, and Julia Rommel will be featured. On view from November 15, 2015, through April 3, 2016, the exhibitions will mark the first time in over twenty years that The Aldrich has dedicated all of its galleries to painting.

The last one hundred years have witnessed the explosion of virtually every available means and medium in the service of art making, yet painting has not only maintained a central position in visual art, but has also adapted creatively to rapid changes in our culture as a whole. Today, painting is embedded in the broad debate of actual vs. virtual, and its ability to balance what is illusive and what is real, what is tactile and what is optical, and what is emotive and what is formal, providing fertile ground for a diverse range of artists.

“While some point to marketability as the basis for the unwavering position of painting as a leading visual arts medium, for many artists, painting provides the most relevant platform for expression, allowing for both the potential of innovation and deep historical continuity,” says Richard Klein, The Aldrich’s exhibitions director.

Aldrich curator Amy Smith-Stewart explains, “The four artists selected span generations, methods, and intentions, but all are deeply entrenched in what painting is and can be in the image-dominated atmosphere of our twenty-first century.”

The public are invited to a free reception celebrating the four exhibitions from 2 to 5 pm on Sunday, November 15.

The Artist

Ruth Root was born in Chicago in 1967 and works in New York City. Her work has been exhibited at Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York; Maureen Paley gallery, London; Galerie Nikolaus Ruzicska, Salzburg, Austria; Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire; The Suburban, Oak Park, Illinois; MoMA PS1, Long Island City, New York; ArtPace, San Antonio, Texas; LACMA, Los Angeles; and the Seattle Art Museum, among others.

The Museum

Founded by Larry Aldrich in 1964, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is dedicated to fostering the work of pioneering artists whose interpretations of the world around us serve as a platform to encourage creative thinking. The Aldrich is one of the few independent, non-collecting contemporary art museums in the United States and the only museum in Connecticut devoted to contemporary art, and engages its diverse audiences with thought-provoking, interdisciplinary exhibitions and programs.

The Museum’s education and public programs are designed to connect visitors of all ages to contemporary art through innovative learning approaches in hands-on workshops, tours, and presentations led by artists, curators, Museum educators, and experts in related fields. Area schools are served by curriculum-aligned on-site and in-school programs, as well as teachers’ professional development training.

Supporters

The Aldrich, in addition to significant support from its Board of Trustees, receives contributions from many dedicated friends and patrons. Major funding for Museum programs and operations has been provided by the Department of Economic and Community Development, Connecticut Office of the Arts; the National Endowment for the Arts; the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation; the Leir Charitable Foundations; the Goldstone Family Foundation; the Anne S. Richardson Fund; and Fairfield Fine Art.

Support for Education and Public programs has been provided by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, JoyRide Ridgefield, the Newman’s Own Foundation, Fairfield County Bank, Fairfield County’s Community Foundation, Ridgefield Education Foundation, The Cowles Charitable Trust, and The Gage Fund.

HamletHub; TownVibe, publishers of Ridgefield Magazine; and WSHU Public Radio are the official media sponsors of The Aldrich in 2015.

For additional information and images, please contact:

Kris Honeycutt The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum press@aldrichart.org 203.438.4519, extension 125

Press Release

Julia Rommel: Two Italians, Six Lifeguards

November, 2015

Image: Julia Rommel, Moroccan Boyfriend, 2015
Courtesy of the artist and Bureau, New York

Ridgefield, CT (September 2015): The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum will present Julia Rommel’s first solo museum exhibition, Two Italians, Six Lifeguards, as part of the Painting in Four Takes exhibition series from November 15, 2015, through April 3, 2016.

Rommel will debut a series of new paintings presented alongside small works from 2010 to 2012. The oil paintings range from head to body size, and oscillate between cool and warm palettes, color fields of denim blues, moody greys, creamy whites, salmon pinks, and citrus hues. All are intimately connected to their edges, as they are stretched and re-stretched numerous times over the course of their making in a physical wrangle of layering and effacing. As with haiku poetry, Rommel’s seemingly accessible surfaces belie their mysterious complexity, involving a laborious choreography of cutting, sanding, wiping, expunging, and overlaying, as the build-up and break down of the composition both reveals and disguises a history of choices and decisions, giving the paintings a rhythm and expression not unlike a life cycle. Taken in concert, Rommel’s stressed surfaces, with their bends, folds, cracks, frayed edges and staple holes, have a vitality that connects them to the viewer—and the viewer to the works—in various stages of being and becoming.

Julia Rommel: Two Italians, Six Lifeguards has been organized by Aldrich curator Amy Smith-Stewart.

Painting in Four Takes

Julia Rommel: Two Italians, Six Lifeguards is part of Painting in Four Takes, a series of solo exhibitions that will provide a window into the practices of four engaging painters who imbue the medium with relevance and character. In addition to Rommel, Steve DiBenedetto, Hayal Pozanti, and Ruth Root will be featured. On view from November 15, 2015, through April 3, 2016, the exhibitions will mark the first time in over twenty years that The Aldrich has dedicated all of its galleries to painting.

The last one hundred years have witnessed the explosion of virtually every available means and medium in the service of art making, yet painting has not only maintained a central position in visual art, but has also adapted creatively to rapid changes in our culture as a whole. Today, painting is embedded in the broad debate of actual vs. virtual, and its ability to balance what is illusive and what is real, what is tactile and what is optical, and what is emotive and what is formal, providing fertile ground for a diverse range of artists.

“While some point to marketability as the basis for the unwavering position of painting as a leading visual arts medium, for many artists, painting provides the most relevant platform for expression, allowing for both the potential of innovation and deep historical continuity,” says Richard Klein, The Aldrich’s exhibitions director.

Aldrich curator Amy Smith-Stewart explains, “The four artists selected span generations, methods, and intentions, but all are deeply entrenched in what painting is and can be in the image-dominated atmosphere of our twenty-first century.”

The public are invited to a free reception celebrating the four exhibitions from 2 to 5 pm on Sunday, November 15.

The Artist

Julia Rommel was born in 1980 in Salisbury, Maryland, and lives and works in New York. She received her MFA from American University in Washington, DC. She has mounted solo exhibitions, Delaware (2012) and The Little Matchstick (2014), at Bureau, New York; Girl with Silver Rings, at Sorry We’re Closed, Brussels (2104); and Mother Superior (2013) at Gaudel de Stampa, Paris. She has been included in group exhibitions at the Flag Foundation, New York; White Flag Projects, St Louis; T293, Naples; and Greene Naftali, New York; among others. Her work was presented by Bureau at Art Basel Statements in June 2015 and at Lora Reynolds Gallery, Austin, in a three-person exhibition.

The Museum

Founded by Larry Aldrich in 1964, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is dedicated to fostering the work of pioneering artists whose interpretations of the world around us serve as a platform to encourage creative thinking. The Aldrich is one of the few independent, non-collecting contemporary art museums in the United States and the only museum in Connecticut devoted to contemporary art, and engages its diverse audiences with thought-provoking, interdisciplinary exhibitions and programs.

The Museum’s education and public programs are designed to connect visitors of all ages to contemporary art through innovative learning approaches in hands-on workshops, tours, and presentations led by artists, curators, Museum educators, and experts in related fields. Area schools are served by curriculum-aligned on-site and in-school programs, as well as teachers’ professional development training.

Supporters

The Aldrich, in addition to significant support from its Board of Trustees, receives contributions from many dedicated friends and patrons. Major funding for Museum programs and operations has been provided by the Department of Economic and Community Development, Connecticut Office of the Arts; the National Endowment for the Arts; the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation; the Leir Charitable Foundations; the Goldstone Family Foundation; the Anne S. Richardson Fund; and Fairfield Fine Art.

Support for Education and Public programs has been provided by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, JoyRide Ridgefield, the Newman’s Own Foundation, Fairfield County Bank, Fairfield County’s Community Foundation, Ridgefield Education Foundation, The Cowles Charitable Trust, and The Gage Fund.

HamletHub; TownVibe, publishers of Ridgefield Magazine; and WSHU Public Radio are the official media sponsors of The Aldrich in 2015.

For additional information and images, please contact:

Kris Honeycutt The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum press@aldrichart.org 203.438.4519, extension 125

Press Release

Hayal Pozanti: Deep Learning

November, 2015

Image: Hayal Pozanti, 18, 2015
Courtesy of the artist and Jessica Silverman Gallery, San Francisco

Ridgefield, CT (September 2015): Turkish-born artist Hayal Pozanti will debut a new series of paintings and digital animations in her first solo museum exhibition, Deep Learning, to be presented at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum as part of the Painting in Four Takes series from November 15, 2015, through April 3, 2016.

The practice of Hayal Pozanti spans painting, digital animation, and sculpture. For the exhibition, she will debut a new series of paintings and digital animations. Pozanti negotiates two opposing image-producing interfaces, the digital, with its mechanical, frenetic pace, and traditional studio practice, with its slowness, imperfection and tactile insistence. To do so, she has invented “Instant Paradise”: a thirty-one-character “alphabet,” which she uses to generate shapes that never repeat themselves, nor have a recognizable equivalent in visual culture. Embedded within these shapes are bundles of mined data relating to the impact of contemporary technological developments on human lives. Through this process, Pozanti acts as a digital-to-analog encryption system so as to preserve information that could be lost or altered in the cloud. Her movement, from freehand to track pad, reinforces her intent, so that the final composition is equally successful online and in person. Alongside her paintings, and sometimes shown side by side, she creates digital animations, both informed by her back and forth translation of mechanical and digital processes and her desire for the means via which they are seen to be interchangeable, non hierarchical, and streamlined.

Hayal Pozanti: Deep Learning has been organized by Aldrich curator Amy Smith- Stewart.

Painting in Four Takes

Hayal Pozanti: Deep Learning is part of Painting in Four Takes, a series of solo exhibitions that will provide a window into the practices of four engaging painters who imbue the medium with relevance and character. In addition to Pozanti, Steve DiBenedetto, Julia Rommel, and Ruth Root will be featured. On view from November 15, 2015, through April 3, 2016, the exhibitions will mark the first time in over twenty years that The Aldrich has dedicated all of its galleries to painting.

The last one hundred years have witnessed the explosion of virtually every available means and medium in the service of art making, yet painting has not only maintained a central position in visual art, but has also adapted creatively to rapid changes in our culture as a whole. Today, painting is embedded in the broad debate of actual vs. virtual, and its ability to balance what is illusive and what is real, what is tactile and what is optical, and what is emotive and what is formal, providing fertile ground for a diverse range of artists.

“While some point to marketability as the basis for the unwavering position of painting as a leading visual arts medium, for many artists, painting provides the most relevant platform for expression, allowing for both the potential of innovation and deep historical continuity,” says Richard Klein, The Aldrich’s exhibitions director.

Aldrich curator Amy Smith-Stewart explains, “The four artists selected span generations, methods, and intentions, but all are deeply entrenched in what painting is and can be in the image-dominated atmosphere of our twenty-first century.”

The public are invited to a free reception celebrating the four exhibitions from 2 to 5 pm on Sunday, November 15.

The Artist

Hayal Pozanti was born in Istanbul in 1983 and now lives in New York. She earned an MFA from Yale University and a BA from Sabanci University. She was featured in Prospect 3, the New Orleans biennial, and is in the collections of JP Morgan and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Pozanti has exhibited in Berlin, Chicago, Los Angeles, Milan, and New York. She was recently included in group exhibitions such as Women and Abstraction at Cornell Fine Arts Museum in Winter Park, Reunion at Sabanci Museum in Istanbul, Turkey, and Then They Form US at MCA Santa Barbara.

The Museum

Founded by Larry Aldrich in 1964, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is dedicated to fostering the work of pioneering artists whose interpretations of the world around us serve as a platform to encourage creative thinking. The Aldrich is one of the few independent, non-collecting contemporary art museums in the United States and the only museum in Connecticut devoted to contemporary art, and engages its diverse audiences with thought-provoking, interdisciplinary exhibitions and programs.

The Museum’s education and public programs are designed to connect visitors of all ages to contemporary art through innovative learning approaches in hands-on workshops, tours, and presentations led by artists, curators, Museum educators, and experts in related fields. Area schools are served by curriculum-aligned on-site and in-school programs, as well as teachers’ professional development training.

Supporters

Generous support for Hayal Pozanti: Deep Learning is provided by Jennifer and Claude Amadeo and Patrons Circle contributors Serge and Ian Krawiecki Gazes.

The Aldrich, in addition to significant support from its Board of Trustees, receives contributions from many dedicated friends and patrons. Major funding for Museum programs and operations has been provided by the Department of Economic and Community Development, Connecticut Office of the Arts; the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation; the William Randolph Hearst Foundation; the Leir Charitable Foundations; The Goldstone Family Foundation; the Anne S. Richardson Fund; the National Endowment for the Arts; the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, Inc.; The Coby Foundation; JoyRide Ridgefield; Newman’s Own Foundation; the SAHA Association; Fairfield Fine Art; The Cowles Charitable Trust; The Gage Fund; Fairfield County Bank; Fairfield County’s Community Foundation; Ridgefield Education Foundation; and Cohen and Wolf.
HamletHub; TownVibe, publishers of Ridgefield Magazine; and WSHU Public Radio are the official media sponsors of The Aldrich in 2015.

Kris Honeycutt The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum press@aldrichart.org 203.438.4519, extension 125

Press Release

Steve DiBenedetto: Evidence of Everything

November, 2015

Image: Steve DiBenedetto, I, Robot, 2015
Collection of Molly and William Rand, New York

Ridgefield, CT (September 2015): In a career that spans three decades, Steve DiBenedetto has established himself as an idiosyncratic artist who has brought the pursuit of painting into the unpredictable chaos and flux that categorize the Postmodern world.

DiBenedetto’s first major solo museum exhibition, Evidence of Everything, will be on view at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum from November 15, 2015, through April 3, 2016, as part of the Painting in Four Takes exhibition series.

The artist has consistently rejected formalism throughout an era where both formal and conceptual approaches to painting have become de rigueur, taking a position where the canvas and the act of painting initiate a site for struggle, invention, and, ultimately, reinvention. Utilizing an inventory of leitmotifs, including the helicopter, octopus, wheel, and glass office tower, DiBenedetto paints and repaints his subjects in states of apocalyptic trauma where content and technique become unified, while the boundaries between the objective and subjective become uncertain. The artist’s work has prophetic, philosophical, and mystical undercurrents, with imagery often forming geometric webs or mandala-like vortices that tear themselves apart only to recongeal in thick, spectral passages of paint. Through his work, DiBenedetto has cast himself as a kind of baroque symbolist, working in the deep tradition of European Romanticism, with his excesses tempered by a terrible, yet transcendental beauty. “You never know what is enough,” wrote William Blake, “unless you know what is more than enough.” Marked by both foresight and revelation, DiBenedetto’s painting exists in a continuum that flows from Blake to speculative novelist William Gibson. The exhibition will include works from 1997 to the present with a focus on the past five years.

Steve DiBenedetto: Evidence of Everything has been organized by Aldrich exhibitions director Richard Klein.

Painting in Four Takes

Steve DiBenedetto: Evidence of Everything is part of Painting in Four Takes, a series of solo exhibitions that will provide a window into the practices of four engaging painters who imbue the medium with relevance and character. In addition to DiBenedetto, Hayal Pozanti, Julia Rommel, and Ruth Root will be featured. On view from November 15, 2015, through April 3, 2016, the exhibitions will mark the first time in over twenty years that The Aldrich has dedicated all of its galleries to painting.

The last one hundred years have witnessed the explosion of virtually every available means and medium in the service of art making, yet painting has not only maintained a central position in visual art, but has also adapted creatively to rapid changes in our culture as a whole. Today, painting is embedded in the broad debate

of actual vs. virtual, and its ability to balance what is illusive and what is real, what is tactile and what is optical, and what is emotive and what is formal, providing fertile ground for a diverse range of artists.

“While some point to marketability as the basis for the unwavering position of painting as a leading visual arts medium, for many artists, painting provides the most relevant platform for expression, allowing for both the potential of innovation and deep historical continuity,” says Richard Klein, The Aldrich’s exhibitions director.

Aldrich curator Amy Smith-Stewart explains, “The four artists selected span generations, methods, and intentions, but all are deeply entrenched in what painting is and can be in the image-dominated atmosphere of our twenty-first century.”

The public are invited to a free reception celebrating the four exhibitions from 2 to 5 pm on Sunday, November 15.

The Artist

Steve DiBenedetto was born in the Bronx, New York, in 1958. He has exhibited widely, including recent shows with Derek Eller Gallery, New York; Daniel Weinberg Gallery, Los Angeles; David Nolan Gallery, New York; Half Gallery, New York; and a two person exhibition with Terry Winters at National Exemplar, New York. His work is in the permanent collections of the American Academy of Arts and Letters; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Also an accomplished drummer, DiBenedetto’s band, Bob Carol Ted, performed in Venice during the 2015 Venice Biennale.

The Museum

Founded by Larry Aldrich in 1964, The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum is dedicated to fostering the work of pioneering artists whose interpretations of the world around us serve as a platform to encourage creative thinking. The Aldrich is one of the few independent, non-collecting contemporary art museums in the United States and the only museum in Connecticut devoted to contemporary art, and engages its diverse audiences with thought-provoking, interdisciplinary exhibitions and programs.

The Museum’s education and public programs are designed to connect visitors of all ages to contemporary art through innovative learning approaches in hands-on workshops, tours, and presentations led by artists, curators, Museum educators, and experts in related fields. Area schools are served by curriculum-aligned on-site and in-school programs, as well as teachers’ professional development training.

Supporters

Generous support for Steve DiBenedetto: Evidence of Everything is provided by Patrons Circle contributors David Nolan Gallery, Alvin Hall, Melvin and Helen Heller, Brooke and Daniel Neidich, Anna and Martin Rabinowitz, and Sara and John Shlesinger.

The Aldrich, in addition to significant support from its Board of Trustees, receives contributions from many dedicated friends and patrons. Major funding for Museum programs and operations has been provided by the Department of Economic and Community Development, Connecticut Office of the Arts; the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation; the William Randolph Hearst Foundation; the Leir Charitable Foundations; The Goldstone Family Foundation; the Anne S. Richardson Fund; the National Endowment for the Arts; the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, Inc.; The Coby Foundation; JoyRide Ridgefield; Newman’s Own Foundation; the SAHA Association; Fairfield Fine Art; The Cowles Charitable Trust; The Gage Fund; Fairfield County Bank; Fairfield County’s Community Foundation; Ridgefield Education Foundation; and Cohen and Wolf.

HamletHub; TownVibe, publishers of Ridgefield Magazine; and WSHU Public Radio are the official media sponsors of The Aldrich in 2015.

For additional information and images, please contact:

Kris Honeycutt The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum press@aldrichart.org 203.438.4519, extension 125

Exhibition

B. Wurtz

Four Collections

May 3, 2015, to October 25, 2015

For more than forty years, B. Wurtz has been transforming throwaway objects found in daily life—shoelaces, plastic bags, food containers, buttons, socks, hangers—into elegant, poetic compositions that evoke the condition of being human. Wurtz’s sculptures and wall pieces employ a strategy of arrangement hinged upon a simple and direct means of expression, a balancing of two opposing forces—the cast-off and the collectible, the timeless and the ephemeral—that speaks at once to the mind and the heart.

Since 1990, Wurtz has produced an ongoing body of work that he refers to as “pan paintings.” These wall pieces are made from ordinary aluminum food containers and roasting pans purchased at grocery or variety stores. These inexpensive and disposable pans transcend socio-economic class, passing through every home; but by painting over the patterns and texts on the exterior of the pans with various colors of acrylic paint, Wurtz has transformed the ordinary into something invaluable. For The Aldrich, he covers three walls of the Erna D. Leir Gallery, salon style, with over 200 of his pan paintings dating from 1991 to 2015. Appearing like geometric abstractions, their compositions are predetermined not by Wurtz, but by a nameless maker, as he accentuates the full range of their embossed designs. Alongside his own works, on a long shelf, Wurtz presents a collection of common domestic objects he’s been acquiring over the years from second-hand shops and eBay. The objects—from American Brilliant cut glassware to Wedgwood pottery and mid-century Danish modern Krenit bowls—represent a number of distinctive styles and periods, and have no immediate connection to each other. In bringing them together, Wurtz offers up a compelling dialogue about high art, decorative art, form and function, as well as the act of collecting.

Amy Smith-Stewart, curator

B. Wurtz was born in 1948 in Pasadena, California, and lives and works in New York City.

Image: B. Wurtz, Untitled (Pan Painting), 2013
Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York

Circumstance highlights inspiration and its influence across object- making, through the specifically commissioned work of six multi- generational artists. The exhibitions underscore the intersection of installation art and exhibition design, and show how the convergence of fine art, design, and non-art objects within the exhibition format informs and elucidates creative expression. For six months, the entire museum facility — whose distinctive galleries range from the intimate to the spacious — will be transformed into “rooms” designed by the exhibiting artists, which will “read” as total works of art as they show their own work alongside objects and/or artworks by other artists they have selected. In some instances, works may extend outside of the Museum’s walls, providing alternative ways of perceiving space by offering extended lines of sight across the campus. In doing so, Circumstance attempts to explore the interstices where art and object come together, come apart, and reunify, by examining context, its many shifts and permutations, and tracing the movement of art and objects from the studio to the museum. In the captivating maze of intersecting rooms, craft, found, utilitarian, historical design, and everyday objects will sit beside works of art, informing us as to how artists take inspiration from what is around them. Selected artworks and objects will enhance our “reading” and innovatively offer—vis-à-vis a visual form of storytelling—intersecting and interdynamic narratives about these works of art and their makers, confronting us with larger questions about history, culture, and society. Participating artists Virginia Poundstone, Nancy Shaver, Ruby Sky Stiler, Penelope Umbrico, Elif Uras, and B. Wurtz will take center stage in the development, conceptualization, and reception of their work, as the Museum assists them to reveal never-before-seen aspects of their practice.

Exhibition

Elif Uras

Nicaea

May 3, 2015, to October 25, 2015

The paintings and ceramic sculptures of Elif Uras explore what she describes as “shifting notions of gender and class within the context of the struggle between modernity and tradition.” Uras’s sculptures are made onsite in Iznik, Turkey (originally Nicaea, named after a nymph in Greek mythology), a town celebrated for its tile and ceramic production during the Ottoman Empire. Uras’s imagery merges traditional nonfigurative Turkish art with the Western figurative tradition, while also exploring the representation of the female body across cultures.

Historically, Iznik reflected the patriarchy of the traditional society, with male artists and craftspeople producing work that adorned the walls of spaces mostly limited to men, such as their segregated quarters in mosques and baths. In Iznik today, women are very dominant in both the management and labor of ceramic production. Uras’s sensous vessels reflect this transformation of gender roles by placing the female figure center stage. Whether depicting women farming olives and making pottery—two industries that connect the present with the past—or alluding to the pregnant body, Uras’s vessels and plates populate the gallery with distinctly feminine forms and imagery.

Uras has transformed The Aldrich’s Screening Room to resemble an interior courtyard, a prominent feature in traditional Turkish architecture, incorporating domestic objects and architectural motifs. A functioning ceramic fountain sits in the center of the gallery atop a carpet-like grid of painted tiles. Water and its constant flow, popular symbols of fertility and prosperity, reinforce the exhibition’s primordial focus. In a tiled wall niche, small vessels are placed on a long shelf, a nod to their inherent domesticity. On the outside wall, a painted tile mural inspired by a historic Iznik panel from the Topkapi Museum presents central figures that resemble Art Nouveau water nymphs.

Alongside Uras’s own work, created especially for The Aldrich, the exhibition presents an original Iznik plate dating from the first half of the sixteenth century, on loan from the collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art. The Iznik plate is positioned in dialogue with Uras’s plates and vessels, some of which incorporate its intricate spiral motif.

Amy Smith-Stewart, curator

Elif Uras was born in 1972 in Ankara, Turkey, and lives and works in New York City and Istanbul, Turkey.

Elif Uras, Installation View at The Aldrich, 2015
Courtesy of the artist and Galerist, Istanbul
Photo: Barış Özçetin

Circumstance highlights inspiration and its influence across object- making, through the specifically commissioned work of six multi- generational artists. The exhibitions underscore the intersection of installation art and exhibition design, and show how the convergence of fine art, design, and non-art objects within the exhibition format informs and elucidates creative expression. For six months, the entire museum facility — whose distinctive galleries range from the intimate to the spacious — will be transformed into “rooms” designed by the exhibiting artists, which will “read” as total works of art as they show their own work alongside objects and/or artworks by other artists they have selected. In some instances, works may extend outside of the Museum’s walls, providing alternative ways of perceiving space by offering extended lines of sight across the campus. In doing so, Circumstance attempts to explore the interstices where art and object come together, come apart, and reunify, by examining context, its many shifts and permutations, and tracing the movement of art and objects from the studio to the museum. In the captivating maze of intersecting rooms, craft, found, utilitarian, historical design, and everyday objects will sit beside works of art, informing us as to how artists take inspiration from what is around them. Selected artworks and objects will enhance our “reading” and innovatively offer—vis-à-vis a visual form of storytelling—intersecting and interdynamic narratives about these works of art and their makers, confronting us with larger questions about history, culture, and society. Participating artists Virginia Poundstone, Nancy Shaver, Ruby Sky Stiler, Penelope Umbrico, Elif Uras, and B. Wurtz will take center stage in the development, conceptualization, and reception of their work, as the Museum assists them to reveal never-before-seen aspects of their practice.

Exhibition

Penelope Umbrico

Shallow Sun

May 3, 2015, to October 25, 2015

For artist Penelope Umbrico, light, and our changing relationship to it, has become one of the main subjects of a practice that challenges what normally constitutes ideas about photography and its presence in our lives. Umbrico is part of the first generation of artists to have participated in the transition from traditional photography to digital media and its attendant complexity. Rather than just swapping one technology for another, however, Umbrico has completely embraced the world in which photography now finds itself—a world where light is transformed into code and completely disassociated from its original context, and where even the sun has become a digital artifact.

This exhibition presents a ricocheting trajectory through photographic history: sunlight, shadows, apertures, dark rooms, chemical-based photography, photocopies, mechanical and electronic hardware (strobe lights, CRTs, ink-jet printing, pixel grids, LEDs), digital processing (image authoring software, video editing software, smart phone camera apps), and the infinite universe of images on the Internet.

Shallow Sun brings together a series of works that play off The Aldrich’s camera obscura, a feature that was included in the Museum’s new building in 2004. The most fundamental of all photographic technologies, the image in a camera obscura is based on contingency: the sunlit landscape that is immediately outdoors is projected “live” onto an interior wall. Here, Umbrico has subverted that process by placing an enclosure that houses a flat-screen monitor on the outside of the camera’s aperture. Playing on the monitor is a version of Umbrico’s piece Sun Screen, a looped, digital animation composed of still sun images the artist has found on the Internet. Sun Screen (Camera Obscura) has taken the fundamental contingent nature of the image in a camera obscura and replaced it with information that comes from the Cloud: sunlight that was turned into code, uploaded onto the Internet, and downloaded as code, converted into screen light, then “reprocessed” back into an image of the sun through analog technology.

In other works in the exhibition, Umbrico has photocopied images of solar eclipses from the picture collection of the New York Public Library and transformed them both by hand and with cell phone camera apps, expanding and engaging the way that an eclipse inverts the usual roles played by the sun and the moon. In the work Light Leaks (from smartphone camera apps) Umbrico has built a “black box,” a space that references both the camera obscura and the inside of a camera, and used it to house a video installation that is composed of an animated library of fake light leak camera app effects in an attempt to return these digital artifacts to the transcendental quality of natural light.

Richard Klein, exhibitions director

Penelope Umbrico was born in 1957 in Philadelphia. She lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

Image: Penelope Umbrico, Suns (from Sunsets) from Flickr, 2006-ongoing
Courtesy of the artist and Mark Moore Gallery, Culver City, CA

Circumstance highlights inspiration and its influence across object- making, through the specifically commissioned work of six multi- generational artists. The exhibitions underscore the intersection of installation art and exhibition design, and show how the convergence of fine art, design, and non-art objects within the exhibition format informs and elucidates creative expression. For six months, the entire museum facility — whose distinctive galleries range from the intimate to the spacious — will be transformed into “rooms” designed by the exhibiting artists, which will “read” as total works of art as they show their own work alongside objects and/or artworks by other artists they have selected. In some instances, works may extend outside of the Museum’s walls, providing alternative ways of perceiving space by offering extended lines of sight across the campus. In doing so, Circumstance attempts to explore the interstices where art and object come together, come apart, and reunify, by examining context, its many shifts and permutations, and tracing the movement of art and objects from the studio to the museum. In the captivating maze of intersecting rooms, craft, found, utilitarian, historical design, and everyday objects will sit beside works of art, informing us as to how artists take inspiration from what is around them. Selected artworks and objects will enhance our “reading” and innovatively offer—vis-à-vis a visual form of storytelling—intersecting and interdynamic narratives about these works of art and their makers, confronting us with larger questions about history, culture, and society. Participating artists Virginia Poundstone, Nancy Shaver, Ruby Sky Stiler, Penelope Umbrico, Elif Uras, and B. Wurtz will take center stage in the development, conceptualization, and reception of their work, as the Museum assists them to reveal never-before-seen aspects of their practice.

Exhibition

Ruby Sky Stiler

Ghost Versions

May 3, 2015, to October 25, 2015

Ruby Sky Stiler’s (b. 1979, Portland, Maine) experimentation with Hydrocal plaster evolved alongside her interest in the scholarly history of classical plaster cast replications. Through time these objects have fallen in and out of favor. Her cast reliefs originate from compositions of detritus from previous works and fragments of left-over materials salvaged from around her studio, making ghostly references to objects she describes as “not present and no longer in existence.” For The Aldrich, her site-specific installation will display her own wall-scale plaster reliefs with a selection of classical casts. The wall arrangement will consist of multiple casts of her works, designed as a tiled repeat pattern. This process calls to mind classical bas-relief, design elements in Le Corbusier’s concrete architecture, Picasso’s sgraffito works, low relief in municipal sculpture, and decorative relief. This interplay of references, espousing both the high and low, explores questions of taste, originality and value.

Curated by Amy Smith-Stewart.

Image: Ruby Sky Stiler, Pattern Frieze (diptych), 2015
Courtesy of the artist and Nicelle Beauchene Gallery, New York

Circumstance highlights inspiration and its influence across object- making, through the specifically commissioned work of six multi- generational artists. The exhibitions underscore the intersection of installation art and exhibition design, and show how the convergence of fine art, design, and non-art objects within the exhibition format informs and elucidates creative expression. For six months, the entire museum facility — whose distinctive galleries range from the intimate to the spacious — will be transformed into “rooms” designed by the exhibiting artists, which will “read” as total works of art as they show their own work alongside objects and/or artworks by other artists they have selected. In some instances, works may extend outside of the Museum’s walls, providing alternative ways of perceiving space by offering extended lines of sight across the campus. In doing so, Circumstance attempts to explore the interstices where art and object come together, come apart, and reunify, by examining context, its many shifts and permutations, and tracing the movement of art and objects from the studio to the museum. In the captivating maze of intersecting rooms, craft, found, utilitarian, historical design, and everyday objects will sit beside works of art, informing us as to how artists take inspiration from what is around them. Selected artworks and objects will enhance our “reading” and innovatively offer—vis-à-vis a visual form of storytelling—intersecting and interdynamic narratives about these works of art and their makers, confronting us with larger questions about history, culture, and society. Participating artists Virginia Poundstone, Nancy Shaver, Ruby Sky Stiler, Penelope Umbrico, Elif Uras, and B. Wurtz will take center stage in the development, conceptualization, and reception of their work, as the Museum assists them to reveal never-before-seen aspects of their practice.

Exhibition

Nancy Shaver

Reconciliation

May 3, 2015, to October 25, 2015

Nancy Shaver, in a career that has spanned four decades, has consistently worked to challenge expectations on the aesthetic hierarchies found in visual culture. Her practice, which involves finding objects, making objects, and recontextualizing objects, has been informed by a critical eye that looks—and looks hard—at the culture of materiality with an attitude approaching that of an anthropologist. But Shaver’s practice is not just based in an intellectual pursuit; it is equally informed by personal experience—specifically a life that has been lived in the dichotomy between her rural, working-class roots and the high-art world that she has engaged since the 1970s.

The majority of exhibitions of Shaver’s work include hierarchy-bending components, and Reconciliation is no exception, bringing together the artist’s recent sculpture, works by other artists, found objects, folk art objects, and utilitarian objects. But in this instance, the exhibition is framed by the presence of two artists whose names have probably never been linked before: Walker Evans (1903–1975) and Sonia Delaunay (1885–1979). Evans is the American photographer who became known in the 1930s for his stark depictions of life during the Depression, particularly in the rural south; Delaunay, the French Modernist artist, was a painter and textile and fashion designer. Shaver, through this juxtaposition, is positing her life and work as a reconciliation between the make-do aesthetics of Allie Mae Burroughs, a cotton sharecropper whose home in Alabama was extensively photographed by Evans in 1935, and Delaunay’s sophisticated endeavors in the Parisian art and fashion world of the 1920s.

Shaver’s sculpture primarily utilizes fragments of used clothing fabric and other textiles that reflect the demographics of the region around her home in upstate New York. She selects fabrics not just for the abstract patterning and color, but also for their encoded sociological meaning. For instance, fancy dress material is placed adjacent to camouflage fabric; tweed is butted up against boy’s pajama material printed with sports motifs. Besides “cheap” cloth, Shaver frequently incorporates fragments of highly refined Japanese textiles, as well as patterned fabric that she creates by drawing with a china marker on muslin. Shaver’s work suggests horizontal movement, a socioeconomic leveling where there really isn’t much of a difference between haute couture and Walmart. The collaged fabric-scrap nature of these works resembles quilting, and Shaver is very aware that her process relates to vernacular fabric collage; but by wrapping fabric around wooden blocks and assembling the blocks into three dimensional objects, she is declaring them to be more a part of the world of art—not craft—a position where both making and philosophical inquiry are on an equal footing.

Richard Klein, exhibitions director

Nancy Shaver was born in 1946 in Appleton, New York; she lives and works in Jefferson, New York.

Image: Nancy Shaver, Untitled, 2014
Courtesy of the artist

Circumstance highlights inspiration and its influence across object- making, through the specifically commissioned work of six multi- generational artists. The exhibitions underscore the intersection of installation art and exhibition design, and show how the convergence of fine art, design, and non-art objects within the exhibition format informs and elucidates creative expression. For six months, the entire museum facility — whose distinctive galleries range from the intimate to the spacious — will be transformed into “rooms” designed by the exhibiting artists, which will “read” as total works of art as they show their own work alongside objects and/or artworks by other artists they have selected. In some instances, works may extend outside of the Museum’s walls, providing alternative ways of perceiving space by offering extended lines of sight across the campus. In doing so, Circumstance attempts to explore the interstices where art and object come together, come apart, and reunify, by examining context, its many shifts and permutations, and tracing the movement of art and objects from the studio to the museum. In the captivating maze of intersecting rooms, craft, found, utilitarian, historical design, and everyday objects will sit beside works of art, informing us as to how artists take inspiration from what is around them. Selected artworks and objects will enhance our “reading” and innovatively offer—vis-à-vis a visual form of storytelling—intersecting and interdynamic narratives about these works of art and their makers, confronting us with larger questions about history, culture, and society. Participating artists Virginia Poundstone, Nancy Shaver, Ruby Sky Stiler, Penelope Umbrico, Elif Uras, and B. Wurtz will take center stage in the development, conceptualization, and reception of their work, as the Museum assists them to reveal never-before-seen aspects of their practice.

Entrepreneur

$3,000

$3,000

  • Free admission to The Aldrich for all employees and accompanying family members.
  • Corporate entertaining opportunity to host an event or staff retreat at The Aldrich with 10% discount on rental fee—a savings of $350+
  • Invitations to members-only exhibition preview, upon request, for 10 clients and 10 employees
  • 30 guest passes for general admission to the Museum

To join at this level, please contact Ashley Prymas, Associate Director, Marketing and Partnerships at aprymas@aldrichart.org or call 203.438.4519 extension 112 during regular museum hours.

Thank you for your support.

Stakeholder

$5,000

$5,000

  • Free admission to The Aldrich for all employees and accompanying family members
  • Private tour for up to 25 accompanying guests with executive director or curator, by appointment
  • Corporate entertaining opportunity to host an event or staff retreat at The Aldrich with 20% discount on rental fee—a savings of $700+
  • Invitations to members-only exhibition preview, upon request, for 20 clients and 10 employees
  • 45 guest passes for free admission to the Museum

To join at this level, please contact Ashley Prymas, Associate Director, Marketing and Partnerships at aprymas@aldrichart.org or call 203.438.4519 extension 112 during regular museum hours.

Thank you for your support.

Philanthropist

$10,000

$10,000

  • Free admission to The Aldrich for all employees and accompanying family members
  • Philanthropist partners will have the opportunity to directly impact and support local education programs in conjunction with The Aldrich
  • Support Pre-K to 12 class visits
  • Support Art Write—a program for Grades 1 through 12 in which participants investigate works of art as a platform for critical and creative thinking
  • Support School in Residence—a program for Grades 2 through 12 in which participants look at contemporary art and explore interdisciplinary topics such as English, Social Studies, and Science
  • Support Art Onsite—a program for pre-schoolers where the Museum becomes their classroom and art studio during multiple visits that complement school curriculum.
  • Private tour for up to 25 accompanying guests with executive director or curator and exhibiting artist, by appointment, for each exhibition

To join at this level, please contact Ashley Prymas, Associate Director, Marketing and Partnerships at aprymas@aldrichart.org or call 203.438.4519 extension 112 during regular museum hours.

Thank you for your support.

Investor

$10,000

$10,000

  • Free admission to The Aldrich for all employees and accompanying family members
  • Acknowledgment as an exhibition sponsor for an exhibition of choice per year
  • Private tour for up to 25 accompanying guests with executive director or curator and exhibiting artist, by appointment, for each exhibition
  • Corporate entertaining opportunity to host an event or staff retreat at The Aldrich with 20% discount on rental fee—a savings of $700+
  • Invitations to members-only exhibition preview, upon request, for 20 clients and 10 employees
  • 60 guest passes for free admission to the Museum

To join at this level, please contact Ashley Prymas, Associate Director, Marketing and Partnerships at aprymas@aldrichart.org or call 203.438.4519 extension 112 during regular museum hours.

Thank you for your support.

Family Guild

$500

$500 ($440 tax deductible)

Special Summer Offer! Join by August 31, 2017 and add two free months to your annual membership and receive a signed Tony Matelli limited-edition poster. PLUS, receive summer discounts at the following
Ridgefield establishments:

Bailey’s Backyard*
The Cake Box* (excluding cake and event orders)
Swoon* (excluding cake and event orders)
Terra Restaurant, Danbury**

*10% off bill before tax. Tuesdays through Thursdays only.
** 20% off lunch bill before tax. Not valid on holidays. May not be combined with prix fixe lunch.

A summer promotion card will accompany membership cards. Promotion card must be presented at each location to receive your one-time discount. Promotion and discounts valid through August 31, 2017.

Family Guild Benefits:

  • Unlimited admission per cardholder
  • $5 guest admission
  • Invitations to members-only events
  • Complimentary exhibition catalogues
  • Fairfield/Westchester Museum Alliance reciprocal benefits*
  • Priority registration and program discounts
  • Free admission to curator and artist-led family tours
  • Unlimited admission for immediate family
  • 10% discount on Camp Aldrich
  • Early access to tickets and special pricing for premier social gatherings
  • Exclusive pre-event experiences at social gatherings
  • Reciprocal benefits to over 900 museums in North America**
  • 10% discount on children’s birthday party
  • Acknowledgment on donor wall and website
  • New Benefit – Free admission for two adults and up to 4 children (17 and younger) to Storm King Art Center in New Windsor, NY. (Members must show their Aldrich membership cards and photo ID’s)

*Bruce Museum, The Barnum Museum, Hudson River Museum, Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, Katonah Museum, Neuberger Museum of Art, Wave Hill

** To view participating North American Reciprocal Museums, click here

**To view participating Modern and Contemporary Reciprocal Museums, click here

If you prefer, please mail a check made payable to The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, 258 Main Street, Ridgefield, CT 06877. For further assistance, contact Kathryn Tufano, Senior Development Officer,
at ktufano@aldrichart.org, or 203.438.4519 x148.

Family Supporter

$250

$250 ($220 tax deductible)

Special Summer Offer! Join by August 31, 2017 and add two free months to your annual membership and receive a signed Tony Matelli limited-edition poster. PLUS, receive summer discounts at the following
Ridgefield establishments:

Bailey’s Backyard*
The Cake Box* (excluding cake and event orders)
Swoon* (excluding cake and event orders)
Terra Restaurant, Danbury**

*10% off bill before tax. Tuesdays through Thursdays only.
** 20% off lunch bill before tax. Not valid on holidays. May not be combined with prix fixe lunch.

A summer promotion card will accompany membership cards. Promotion card must be presented at each location to receive your one-time discount. Promotion and discounts valid through August 31, 2017.

Family Supporter Benefits:

  • Unlimited admission per cardholder
  • $5 guest admission
  • Invitations to members-only events
  • Complimentary exhibition catalogues
  • Fairfield/Westchester Museum Alliance reciprocal benefits*
  • Priority registration and program discounts
  • Free admission to curator and artist-led family tours
  • Unlimited admission for immediate family
  • 10% discount on Camp Aldrich
  • Early access to tickets and special pricing for premier social gatherings
  • Exclusive pre-event experiences at social gatherings
  • Reciprocal benefits to over 900 museums in North America**
  • New Benefit – Free admission for two adults and up to 4 children (17 and younger) to Storm King Art Center in New Windsor, NY. (Members must show their Aldrich membership cards and photo ID’s)

*Bruce Museum, The Barnum Museum, Hudson River Museum, Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, Katonah Museum, Neuberger Museum of Art, Wave Hill

** To view participating North American Reciprocal Museums, click here

**To view participating Modern and Contemporary Reciprocal Museums, click here

If you prefer, please mail a check made payable to The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, 258 Main Street, Ridgefield, CT 06877. For further assistance, contact Kathryn Tufano, Senior Development Officer,
at ktufano@aldrichart.org, or 203.438.4519 x148.

Family

$125

$125 ($110 tax deductible)

Special Summer Offer! Join by August 31, 2017 and add two free months to your annual membership! PLUS, receive summer discounts at the following Ridgefield establishments:

Bailey’s Backyard*
The Cake Box* (excluding cake and event orders)
Swoon* (excluding cake and event orders)
Terra Restaurant, Danbury**

*10% off bill before tax. Tuesdays through Thursdays only.
** 20% off lunch bill before tax. Not valid on holidays. May not be combined with prix fixe lunch.

A summer promotion card will accompany membership cards. Promotion card must be presented at each location to receive your one-time discount. Promotion and discounts valid through August 31, 2017.

Family Benefits:

  • Unlimited admission per cardholder
  • $5 guest admission
  • Invitations to members-only events
  • Complimentary exhibition catalogues
  • Fairfield/Westchester Museum Alliance reciprocal benefits*
  • Priority registration and program discounts
  • Early access to tickets and special pricing for premier social gatherings
  • Free admission to curator and artist-led family tours
  • Unlimited admission for immediate family
  • 10% discount on Camp Aldrich
  • New Benefit – Free admission for two adults and up to 4 children (17 and younger) to Storm King Art Center in New Windsor, NY. (Members must show their Aldrich membership cards and photo ID’s)

*Bruce Museum, The Barnum Museum, Hudson River Museum, Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, Katonah Museum, Neuberger Museum of Art, Wave Hill

If you prefer, please mail a check made payable to The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, 258 Main Street, Ridgefield, CT 06877. For further assistance, contact Kathryn Tufano, Senior Development Officer,
at ktufano@aldrichart.org, or 203.438.4519 x148.

Leadership Circle

$2,500

$2,500 ($2,370 tax deductible)

Special Summer Offer! Join by August 31, 2017 and add two free months to your annual membership and receive a signed Tony Matelli limited-edition poster. PLUS, receive summer discounts at the following Ridgefield establishments:

Bailey’s Backyard*
The Cake Box* (excluding cake and event orders)
Swoon* (excluding cake and event orders)
Terra Restaurant, Danbury**

*10% off bill before tax. Tuesdays through Thursdays only.
** 20% off lunch bill before tax. Not valid on holidays. May not be combined with prix fixe lunch.

A summer promotion card will accompany membership cards. Promotion card must be presented at each location to receive your one-time discount. Promotion and discounts valid through August 31, 2017.

Leadership Circle Benefits:

  • Unlimited admission for two cardholders
  • $5 guest admission
  • Invitations to members-only events
  • Complimentary exhibition catalogues
  • Fairfield/Westchester Museum Alliance reciprocal benefit*
  • Priority registration and program discounts
  • Early access to tickets and special pricing for premier social gatherings
  • Exclusive pre-event experiences at social gatherings
  • Reciprocal benefits to over 900 museums in North America**
  • Acknowledgment on donor wall and website
  • Invitations to collection, gallery, and studio visits
  • Four guest passes
  • Advance previews and 10% discounts on Aldrich Editions
  • VIP passes to art fairs, including Frieze New York
  • Private tour with 10 guests
  • Luncheons with artists and speakers
  • Contemporary Council gift membership
  • New Benefit – Free admission for two adults and up to 4 children (17 and younger) to Storm King Art Center in New Windsor, NY. (Members must show their Aldrich membership cards and photo ID’s)

*Bruce Museum, The Barnum Museum, Hudson River Museum, Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, Katonah Museum, Neuberger Museum of Art, Wave Hill

** To view participating North American Reciprocal Museums, click here

**To view participating Modern and Contemporary Reciprocal Museums, click here

If you prefer, please mail a check made payable to The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, 258 Main Street, Ridgefield, CT 06877. For further assistance, contact Kathryn Tufano, Senior Development Officer, at ktufano@aldrichart.org, or 203.438.4519 x148.

    Collectors Circle

    $1,000

    $1,000 ($900 tax deductible)

    Special Summer Offer! Join by August 31, 2017 and add two free months to your annual membership and receive a signed Tony Matelli limited-edition poster. PLUS, receive summer discounts at the following
    Ridgefield establishments:

    Bailey’s Backyard*
    The Cake Box* (excluding cake and event orders)
    Swoon* (excluding cake and event orders)
    Terra Restaurant, Danbury**

    *10% off bill before tax. Tuesdays through Thursdays only.
    ** 20% off lunch bill before tax. Not valid on holidays. May not be combined with prix fixe lunch.

    A summer promotion card will accompany membership cards. Promotion card must be presented at each location to receive your one-time discount. Promotion and discounts valid through August 31, 2017.

    Collectors Circle Benefits:

    • Unlimited admission for two cardholders
    • $5 guest admission
    • Invitations to members-only events
    • Complimentary exhibition catalogues
    • Fairfield/Westchester Museum Alliance reciprocal benefits*
    • Priority registration and program discounts
    • Early access to tickets and special pricing for premier social gatherings
    • Exclusive pre-event experiences at social gatherings
    • Reciprocal benefits to over 900 museums in North America**
    • Acknowledgment on donor wall and website
    • Invitations to collection, gallery, and studio visits
    • Four guest passes
    • Advance previews and 10% discounts on Aldrich Editions
    • VIP passes to art fairs, including Frieze New York
    • New Benefit – Free admission for two adults and up to 4 children (17 and younger) to Storm King Art Center in New Windsor, NY. (Members must show their Aldrich membership cards and photo ID’s)

    *Bruce Museum, The Barnum Museum, Hudson River Museum, Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, Katonah Museum, Neuberger Museum of Art, Wave Hill

    ** To view participating North American Reciprocal Museums, click here

    **To view participating Modern and Contemporary Reciprocal Museums, click here

    Collaborators Circle

    $500

    $500 ($440 tax deductible)

    Special Summer Offer! Join by August 31, 2017 and add two free months to your annual membership and receive a signed Tony Matelli limited-edition poster. PLUS, receive summer discounts at the following
    Ridgefield establishments:

    Bailey’s Backyard*
    The Cake Box* (excluding cake and event orders)
    Swoon* (excluding cake and event orders)
    Terra Restaurant, Danbury**

    *10% off bill before tax. Tuesdays through Thursdays only.
    ** 20% off lunch bill before tax. Not valid on holidays. May not be combined with prix fixe lunch.

    A summer promotion card will accompany membership cards. Promotion card must be presented at each location to receive your one-time discount. Promotion and discounts valid through August 31, 2017.

    Collaborators Circle Benefits:

    • Unlimited admission for two cardholders
    • $5 guest admission
    • Invitations to members-only events
    • Complimentary exhibition catalogues
    • Fairfield/Westchester Museum Alliance reciprocal benefits*
    • Priority registration and program discounts
    • Early access to tickets and special pricing for premier social gatherings
    • Exclusive pre-event experiences at social gatherings
    • Reciprocal benefits to over 900 museums in North America**
    • Acknowledgment on donor wall and website
    • Invitations to collection, gallery, and studio visits
    • New Benefit – Free admission for two adults and up to 4 children (17 and younger) to Storm King Art Center in New Windsor, NY. (Members must show their Aldrich membership cards and photo ID’s)

    *Bruce Museum, The Barnum Museum, Hudson River Museum, Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, Katonah Museum, Neuberger Museum of Art, Wave Hill

    ** To view participating North American Reciprocal Museums, click here

    **To view participating Modern and Contemporary Reciprocal Museums, click here

    If you prefer, please mail a check made payable to The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, 258 Main Street, Ridgefield, CT 06877. For further assistance, contact Kathryn Tufano, Senior Development Officer,at ktufano@aldrichart.org, or 203.438.4519 x148.

    Contemporary Council

    $250

    $250 ($220 tax deductible)

    Special Summer Offer! Join by August 31, 2017 and add two free months to your annual membership and receive a signed Tony Matelli limited-edition poster. PLUS, receive summer discounts at the following Ridgefield establishments:

    Bailey’s Backyard*
    The Cake Box* (excluding cake and event orders)
    Swoon* (excluding cake and event orders)
    Terra Restaurant, Danbury**

    *10% off bill before tax. Tuesdays through Thursdays only.
    ** 20% off lunch bill before tax. Not valid on holidays. May not be combined with prix fixe lunch.

    A summer promotion card will accompany membership cards. Promotion card must be presented at each location to receive your one-time discount. Promotion and discounts valid through August 31, 2017.

    Contemporary Council Benefits:

    • Unlimited admission for two cardholders
    • $5 guest admission
    • Invitations to members-only events
    • Complimentary exhibition catalogues
    • Fairfield/Westchester Museum Alliance reciprocal benefits*
    • Priority registration and program discounts
    • Early access to tickets and special pricing for premier social gatherings
    • Exclusive pre-event experiences at social gatherings
    • Reciprocal benefits to over 900 museums in North America**
    • New Benefit – Free admission for two adults and up to 4 children (17 and younger) to Storm King Art Center in New Windsor, NY. (Members must show their Aldrich membership cards and photo ID’s)

    *Bruce Museum, The Barnum Museum, Hudson River Museum, Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, Katonah Museum, Neuberger Museum of Art, Wave Hill

    ** To view participating North American Reciprocal Museums, click here **To view participating Modern and Contemporary Reciprocal Museums, click here

    If you prefer, please mail a check made payable to The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, 258 Main Street, Ridgefield, CT 06877. For further assistance, contact Kathryn Tufano, Senior Development Officer, at ktufano@aldrichart.org, or 203.438.4519 x148.

    Student/Artist

    $50 Individual

    $50 Individual (fully tax deductible)

    Special Summer Offer! Join by August 31, 2017 and add two free months to your annual membership! PLUS, receive summer discounts at the following Ridgefield establishments:

    Bailey’s Backyard*
    The Cake Box* (excluding cake and event orders)
    Swoon* (excluding cake and event orders)
    Terra Restaurant, Danbury**

    *10% off bill before tax. Tuesdays through Thursdays only.
    ** 20% off lunch bill before tax. Not valid on holidays. May not be combined with prix fixe lunch.

    A summer promotion card will accompany membership cards. Promotion card must be presented at each location to receive your one-time discount. Promotion and discounts valid through August 31, 2017.

    Student/Artist Benefits:

    • Unlimited admission per cardholder
    • $5 guest admission
    • Invitations to members-only events
    • Complimentary exhibition catalogues
    • Fairfield/Westchester Museum Alliance reciprocal benefits*
    • Priority registration and program discounts
    • Early access to tickets and special pricing for premier social gatherings
    • Free admission to curator and artist-led family tours

    *Bruce Museum, The Barnum Museum, Hudson River Museum, Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, Katonah Museum, Neuberger Museum of Art, Wave Hill

    If you prefer, please mail a check made payable to The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, 258 Main Street, Ridgefield, CT 06877. For further assistance, contact Kathryn Tufano, Senior Development Officer,
    at ktufano@aldrichart.org, or 203.438.4519 x148.

    Senior

    $50 Individual — $90 Dual

    $50 Individual (fully tax deductible)
    $90 Dual ($75 tax deductible)

    Special Summer Offer! Join by August 31, 2017 and add two free months to your annual membership! PLUS, receive summer discounts at the following Ridgefield establishments:

    Bailey’s Backyard*
    The Cake Box* (excluding cake and event orders)
    Swoon* (excluding cake and event orders)
    Terra Restaurant, Danbury**

    *10% off bill before tax. Tuesdays through Thursdays only.
    ** 20% off lunch bill before tax. Not valid on holidays. May not be combined with prix fixe lunch.

    A summer promotion card will accompany membership cards. Promotion card must be presented at each location to receive your one-time discount. Promotion and discounts valid through August 31, 2017.

    Senior Benefits:

    • Unlimited admission per cardholder
    • $5 guest admission
    • Invitations to members-only events
    • Complimentary exhibition catalogues
    • Fairfield/Westchester Museum Alliance reciprocal benefits*
    • Priority registration and program discounts
    • Early access to tickets and special pricing for premier social gatherings
    • Free admission to curator and artist-led family tours

    *Bruce Museum, The Barnum Museum, Hudson River Museum, Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, Katonah Museum, Neuberger Museum of Art, Wave Hill

    If you prefer, please mail a check made payable to The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, 258 Main Street, Ridgefield, CT 06877. For further assistance, contact Kathryn Tufano, Senior Development Officer,
    at ktufano@aldrichart.org, or 203.438.4519 x148.

    Membership Level

    Friend

    $65 Individual — $100 Dual

    $65 Individual (fully tax deductible)
    $100 Dual ($85 tax deductible)

    Special Summer Offer! Join by August 31, 2017 and add two free months to your annual membership! PLUS, receive summer discounts at the following Ridgefield establishments:

    Bailey’s Backyard*
    The Cake Box* (excluding cake and event orders)
    Swoon* (excluding cake and event orders)
    Terra Restaurant, Danbury**

    *10% off bill before tax. Tuesdays through Thursdays only.
    ** 20% off lunch bill before tax. Not valid on holidays. May not be combined with prix fixe lunch.

    A summer promotion card will accompany membership cards. Promotion card must be presented at each location to receive your one-time discount. Promotion and discounts valid through August 31, 2017.

    Friend Benefits:

    • Unlimited admission per cardholder
    • $5 guest admission
    • Invitations to members-only events
    • Complimentary exhibition catalogues
    • Fairfield/Westchester Museum Alliance reciprocal benefits*
    • Priority registration and program discounts
    • Early access to tickets and special pricing for premier social gatherings
    • Free admission to curator and artist-led family tours

    *Bruce Museum, The Barnum Museum, Hudson River Museum, Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art, Katonah Museum, Neuberger Museum of Art, Wave Hill

    If you prefer, please mail a check made payable to The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, 258 Main Street, Ridgefield, CT 06877. For further assistance, contact Kathryn Tufano, Senior Development Officer, at ktufano@aldrichart.org, or 203.438.4519 x148.